Thursday, 23/2/2017 | 9:17 UTC+0
  • Smoking cessation counseling can be effective when given shortly after lung cancer screening

    February 15, 2017 at 5:28 AM In the first successful randomized trial of its kind, researchers have provided preliminary evidence that telephone-based smoking cessation counseling given to smokers shortly after undergoing lung cancer screening can be effective at helping people stop smoking. “We found that at this teachable moment — a time when smokers are

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  • ADHD: Large imaging study confirms differences in several brain regions

    The largest imaging study of its kind finds that people diagnosed with ADHD have altered brains. It identifies size differences in several brain regions and the brain overall, with the greatest differences seen in children rather than adults. The researchers say that the findings – from brain images of more than 3,200 people – provide

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  • Restless Legs Syndrome Linked To Earlier Death Risk In Men

    A new study from the US finds that men with restless legs syndrome (RLS) may have a 39% increased risk of dying earlier compared to men without the condition, which is characterized by an irresistible urge to move the legs when lying down, accompanied by creeping, pulling and burning sensations that usually feel worse at

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  • UNC researchers find new potential route to treat asthma

    Researchers at the UNC School of Medicine believe they have isolated a protein that, when missing or depleted, can cause airway constriction, production of mucus, chest tightness, and difficulty breathing for the 334 million people worldwide who suffer from asthma. And they’re hopeful that this discovery, published in Nature Communications, will lead to more effective

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  • Overcoming Multiple Sclerosis: Tips for Recovery from an MS Attack

    Multiple sclerosis is a disease that affects the central nervous system and the transmission of information between the brain and the body. Multiple sclerosis (MS) can be difficult to predict, making it hard for those with MS to manage the disease. However, there are some changes that people with MS can make to help control

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  • Smoking more hazardous for HIV patients than the virus itself

    Cigarette smokers who are HIV positive appear to have a higher chance of dying from smoking-related complications than from HIV, according to research published in the Journal of Infectious Diseases. Smoking is especially dangerous for people with HIV. Numerous health problems are associated with smoking. Smokers have a high chance of developing heart disease, cancer,

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  • Alzheimer's disease: New imaging compound may improve earlier diagnosis

    There is an urgent need for more effective ways to detect Alzheimer’s disease in its preclinical stage – before memory, confusion, and other cognitive problems appear. During this stage, while people appear symptom-free, abnormal proteins are already depositing throughout the brain. Now, a team has developed and tested a compound that appears able to identify

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  • Out in the cold: Why are the oldest people the most excluded?

    People over the age of 85 are significantly more likely to suffer social exclusion than those in the 65 to 84-year-old bracket, according to new research. In a study of more than 10,000 people over the age of 65, social policy researchers found the so-called ‘oldest old’ – classed as those 85 and over –

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  • Benefits of daily aspirin outweigh risk to stomach

    Stomach bleeds caused by aspirin are considerably less serious than the spontaneous bleeds that can occur in people not taking the drug, concludes a study led by Cardiff University. Published in the journal Public Library of Science, the extensive study of literature on aspirin reveals that while regular use of the drug increases the risk

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  • Parkinson-like symptoms in welders worsen with more manganese exposure

    New research involving shipyard and metal fabrication workers finds that increased exposure to the chemical element manganese in welding fumes is linked to the worsening of parkinsonism. This is a group of disorders that share some of the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease, such as slow movement and stiffness. The researchers found that cumulative exposure to

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