Breaking News
July 18, 2018 - Smoking May Boost Atrial Fibrillation Risk
July 18, 2018 - Genome editing method targets AIDS virus
July 18, 2018 - These things matter: Medical complications are not inevitable, a physician writes
July 18, 2018 - Cognitive functions often wilt as water departs the body, shows study
July 18, 2018 - Low-dose ketamine found to be as effective as opioids for treating acute pain
July 18, 2018 - Novel bioengineering technique could help repair bone defects
July 18, 2018 - Researchers identify new potential target protein for colon cancer
July 18, 2018 - Air pollution contributes significantly to diabetes globally
July 18, 2018 - Cell membrane’s importance offers new strategy to fight infections
July 18, 2018 - Researchers identify key protein involved in irregular brain cell activity
July 18, 2018 - 3D modeling of drug resistance could lead to more effective cancer treatment
July 18, 2018 - Hunger hormones could be key to new treatments for drug, alcohol addiction
July 18, 2018 - Nitrate-cured meats may contribute to mania, study finds
July 18, 2018 - Why men may recover more quickly from influenza infections than women
July 18, 2018 - KemPharm Announces Top Line Results from KP415.E01 Efficacy and Safety Trial in Children With ADHD
July 18, 2018 - Self-control and obesity: Gender matters in children
July 18, 2018 - Bioengineers, diabetes researchers convene to discuss future concepts for precision medicine
July 18, 2018 - Practicing yoga benefits pregnant women, study suggests
July 18, 2018 - New strategy may lead to more accurate breast cancer diagnoses
July 18, 2018 - FDA Approves Symtuza (D/C/F/TAF), the First and Only Complete Darunavir-Based Single-Tablet Regimen for the Treatment of HIV-1 Infection
July 18, 2018 - New guide helps hospitals pick right partner to handle hospitalist services
July 18, 2018 - Deep data dive helps predict cerebral palsy
July 18, 2018 - Stricter firearm legislation associated with reduced murder and suicide rates
July 18, 2018 - Physical and sexual abuse in childhood associated with endometriosis risk
July 18, 2018 - Omega 3 supplements do not reduce risk of heart disease, stroke or death
July 18, 2018 - GSA’s new publication provides support for safe use of OTC analgesics by older adults
July 18, 2018 - Researchers receive grant from U.S. Department of Education to study children with HFASD
July 18, 2018 - Early childhood adversity increases sensitivity of the body’s immune response to cocaine
July 18, 2018 - Parental incarceration affects health behaviors of children in adulthood
July 18, 2018 - Researchers find that yellow fever and Asian tiger mosquitoes can carry new virus
July 18, 2018 - Two Regimens Fail to Stop Declines in β-Cell Function
July 18, 2018 - Researchers apply computing power to track the spread of cancer
July 18, 2018 - Olfactory receptors play pathophysiological role in all organs than merely smell perception
July 18, 2018 - Fish consumption associated with lower risk of early death
July 18, 2018 - MR Solutions’ 7T MRI imaging system installed at University of Hawaii
July 18, 2018 - Humorous ads screened around World Cup game achieve higher biometric response than sporty ads
July 18, 2018 - New study demonstrates little effect of hormone therapy on artery thickness
July 18, 2018 - A 3-Pronged Plan to Cut Type 2 Diabetes Risk
July 18, 2018 - New clues to sepsis may speed diagnosis
July 18, 2018 - Stars of Stanford Medicine: Improving cardiovascular health in Africa and beyond
July 18, 2018 - Heart attack risk continues to increase among pregnant women, study finds
July 18, 2018 - Few tips to help avoid sunburns in summer
July 18, 2018 - High-fat diet and systemic inflammation contribute to progression of prostate cancer
July 18, 2018 - Researchers develop 3D map of gene interactions that play key role in heart disease
July 18, 2018 - Conservative management of lung subsolid nodules reduces overtreatment and unnecessary surgery
July 18, 2018 - Report warns of dog illness that can spread to owners
July 18, 2018 - A winning essayist’s tips for keeping track of scientific facts
July 18, 2018 - Researchers seek to understand role of APOE mutation in Alzheimer’s disease
July 18, 2018 - Animal studies reveal brain changes responsible for appetite effects of cannabis
July 18, 2018 - New ZEISS ZEN Intellesis machine allows segmentation of correlative microscopy
July 18, 2018 - Study findings highlight importance of early detection of SMA through newborn screening
July 18, 2018 - Results of Phase III (PIX306) Trial Evaluating Progression-Free Survival of Pixuvri (pixantrone) Combined with Rituximab in Patients with Aggressive B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma
July 18, 2018 - Diabetes researchers find switch for fatty liver disease
July 18, 2018 - The future of the microbiome: A conversation
July 18, 2018 - States attacking ACA would hurt most if shield on preexisting conditions were axed
July 18, 2018 - Novel delivery system for bacteriophages could offer new way to battle lung infections
July 18, 2018 - PTSD may increase risk of stroke, heart attack in World Trade Center response crews
July 18, 2018 - Finding the right protective eyewear for young athletes
July 18, 2018 - Routine screening, treatment could help stem nationwide opioid epidemic
July 17, 2018 - AI and radar technologies could help diabetics manage their disease
July 17, 2018 - New Stanford algorithm could improve diagnosis of many rare genetic diseases
July 17, 2018 - Burdensome symptoms of eczema can lead to impaired quality of life, shows study
July 17, 2018 - Sartorius Stedim Biotech and Penn State partner to advance teaching, research in biotechnology
July 17, 2018 - Researchers map family trees of cancer cells to understand how AML responds to new drug
July 17, 2018 - Mortality from heart failure remains higher in women than men
July 17, 2018 - Can-Fite BioPharma receives Australian and Chinese patents for new drug to treat erectile dysfunction
July 17, 2018 - AAP: Lawnmowers Pose Serious Injury Risk to Children
July 17, 2018 - Fewer U.S. kids are getting cavities
July 17, 2018 - Differences in brain’s reward circuit may explain social deficits in autism
July 17, 2018 - YCC researchers suggest promising treatment for two rare inherited cancer syndromes
July 17, 2018 - FAU and partners receive NIH research grant to shed light on sleep loss and metabolic disorders
July 17, 2018 - Advanced MRI technique predicts risk of disease progression in MS
July 17, 2018 - Health Tip: Microwave Safely – Drugs.com MedNews
July 17, 2018 - New target for treating heart failure identified
July 17, 2018 - Biodesign fellows simplify heart rhythm monitoring
July 17, 2018 - Study reveals new risk genes for allergic rhinitis
July 17, 2018 - Community college education can increase physician diversity and access to primary care
July 17, 2018 - Inflection Biosciences’ dual mechanism inhibitor shows promise as treatment for CLL
July 17, 2018 - Researchers uncover how cells invite corrupted proteins inside
July 17, 2018 - Large international study finds new risk genes for hay fever
Fertility Tests May Not Be Best Gauge of Your Biological Clock

Fertility Tests May Not Be Best Gauge of Your Biological Clock

image_pdfDownload PDFimage_print

HealthDay news image

TUESDAY, Oct. 10, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Women in their 30s and early 40s who want to know whether their biological clocks are running out should skip fertility testing, a new study suggests.

Fertility clinics commonly use blood and urine tests to assess the quantity and quality of eggs remaining in a woman’s ovaries — information that clinicians can use in making decisions about treating infertile women.

However, a study in the Oct. 10 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association found that these tests cannot predict whether a woman in her later reproductive years will get pregnant naturally.

“We were hoping to see that these biomarkers would predict a woman’s ability to get pregnant, but we didn’t find that,” said Dr. Anne Steiner, the study’s lead author.

Steiner, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, said there’s “huge interest” in such a fertility test.

Women generally have more trouble getting pregnant as they age. The egg supply dwindles later in life, and the quality of the remaining eggs declines. As a result, Steiner explained, women often want assurance that there’s still time to start a family or confirmation that they should freeze their eggs for a future pregnancy.

The age at which a woman can no longer conceive varies from person to person. About one-third of couples will have trouble getting pregnant if the female is 35 or older, according to the American Society for Reproductive Medicine.

Low levels of anti-mullerian hormone (AMH) and high levels of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) are considered indicators of low “ovarian reserve,” meaning that a woman has fewer available eggs. That has fueled women’s interest in having blood and urine tests done during annual checkups to monitor their fertility. It’s also fueled a market for over-the-counter urine tests that measure FHS.

Consumers may pay well over $100 for FSH testing, depending on where the test is performed and other variables, according to Healthcare Bluebook, which tracks health care cost and quality data. That doesn’t include the cost of the physician office visit. A “fair price” is about $49, according to the company’s consumer website.

Blood collection and analysis can run from $80 to about $200, Steiner estimated.

Do-it-yourself test kits also are available. One online retailer listed two urine test sticks for $20.

But do blood and urine tests provide an accurate window into a woman’s ability to conceive?

To find out, Steiner and her colleagues recruited women 30 to 44 years old with no known history or risk factors for infertility who were just starting to try to get pregnant. The investigators took their blood and urine samples and followed them for a year to see whether the women conceived.

As expected, AMH levels decreased and FSH levels increased with age. But after accounting for age, women with low ovarian reserve were just as likely to get pregnant as were those with normal values.

Thomas Price, a Duke University obstetrician/gynecologist and president of the Society for Reproductive Endocrinology and Fertility, said that “these tests are very good at predicting how many eggs a woman is going to make with injectable fertility drugs.”

But, Steiner added, these tests cannot be recommended as a predictor of natural pregnancy.

“Age should really be the driver in their reproductive plans, not these biomarker values,” she said.

SOURCES: Anne Steiner, M.D., professor, reproductive endocrinology and fertility, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Thomas Price, M.D., professor, obstetrics and gynecology, division of reproductive endocrinology and infertility, Duke University, Durham, N.C.; American Society for Reproductive Medicine, Washington, D.C.; Oct. 10, 2017, Journal of the American Medical Association

News stories are written and provided by HealthDay and do not reflect federal policy, the views of MedlinePlus, the National Library of Medicine, the National Institutes of Health, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Tagged with:

About author

Related Articles