Breaking News
December 16, 2017 - Research uncovers mechanism implicated in defective function of tumor-associated dendritic cells
December 16, 2017 - OncoBreak: Stubborn Racial Disparities; Paid Medical Leave & Chemo; DIY Gene Tests
December 16, 2017 - Critical link between obesity and diabetes has been identified
December 16, 2017 - Transfusion dependence reduces access to high-quality end-of-life care for leukemia patients
December 16, 2017 - Porvair and Suzhou Tianlong Bio to develop epigenetic analysis technologies
December 16, 2017 - FDA Approves Ixifi (infliximab-qbtx), a Biosimilar to Remicade
December 16, 2017 - Morning Break: Trump to Get Check-Up; Cancerous Transplant; Death Knell for MIPS?
December 16, 2017 - First transcatheter implant for diastolic heart failure successful
December 16, 2017 - ‘Sushi-like’ nanodiscs provide structural snapshots of misfolding proteins
December 16, 2017 - Inherited gene variation may be to blame for poor survival of patients with early-onset breast cancer
December 16, 2017 - Sign-up deadline is Friday, but some people may get extra time
December 16, 2017 - Higher Booze Taxes Might Pay Off for Public Health
December 16, 2017 - Regular Activity in Midlife Spares Joints in Women
December 16, 2017 - Rain May Not Cause Achy Joints After All: MedlinePlus Health News
December 16, 2017 - MedDiet adherence doesn’t affect acute heart failure mortality
December 16, 2017 - HKBU experts develop new generation of smart anti-cancer drug molecules
December 16, 2017 - Chronic Kidney Disease Audit finds wide variations in coding of CKD patients in primary care
December 16, 2017 - Scientists use nanoparticles to fight Mucoviscidosis
December 16, 2017 - Increasing physical activity decreases risk of death from lymphoma
December 16, 2017 - Fear compromises the health, well-being of immigrant families, survey finds
December 16, 2017 - Rejected antibiotic candidate could be worth a second look, research finds
December 16, 2017 - Is Nation on the Right Track to Combat Opioid Crisis?
December 16, 2017 - Arthritis No Longer Just a Disease of the Old: MedlinePlus Health News
December 16, 2017 - Family members without inherited mutation have increased risk of melanoma
December 16, 2017 - Active surveillance proposed as first-line approach to manage patients with low-risk PMC of the thyroid
December 16, 2017 - Patients’ life values affect their attendance at medical treatment for pelvic-floor dysfunction
December 16, 2017 - Experts consider hazards of antibiotic resistances to be high
December 16, 2017 - Study finds erectile dysfunction as risk factor for early cardiovascular disease
December 16, 2017 - Amber-tinted glasses may reduce insomnia severity
December 16, 2017 - Arthritis Drug Seen Lowering GvHD Risk
December 16, 2017 - Atoh1, a potential Achilles’ heel of Sonic Hedgehog medulloblastoma
December 15, 2017 - Cornell engineers develop new method to measure vital signs using radio waves
December 15, 2017 - Rutgers studies highlight need for salon clients, workers to protect themselves from health risks
December 15, 2017 - FDA Approves Nucala (mepolizumab) for Eosinophilic Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis (Churg-Strauss Syndrome)
December 15, 2017 - Morning Break: CVS Buying Aetna; Uterus Transplant Baby; Your Brain on Drugs, Redux
December 15, 2017 - Social phobia linked to autism and schizophrenia
December 15, 2017 - Timestrip technology helping to prevent missed vaccinations
December 15, 2017 - Researchers win NIH grants for Alzheimer’s research on Amish resilience and rapid onset
December 15, 2017 - Mitochondrial error-correction mechanism essential for energy production of cells
December 15, 2017 - New report reveals steep rise in lung disease admissions to emergency departments during winter
December 15, 2017 - Study finds social stigma as barrier to successful treatment of children with HIV in Ethiopia
December 15, 2017 - Health Tip: Keep Gift-Giving Stress Under Wraps
December 15, 2017 - Long Stoppage of Bisphosphonates Tied to More Fractures
December 15, 2017 - Triglycerides Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information
December 15, 2017 - Study shows interventions, though few, can be effective for students with high-functioning autism
December 15, 2017 - Higher blood sugar during first trimester of pregnancy increases child’s risk of congenital heart defect
December 15, 2017 - Study tests accuracy of laboratory-developed cancer tests and FDA-approved companion diagnostics
December 15, 2017 - Extracellular vesicles can be used to effectively delay progression of kidney damage
December 15, 2017 - Targeted lung cancer treatments may benefit smokers and non-smokers alike
December 15, 2017 - Sugary-drink warning labels may help decrease obesity and overweight prevalence
December 15, 2017 - Coarse particulate matter exposure linked to increased asthma risk in children
December 15, 2017 - OCT Angio Gains Ground: Ophthalmology Times
December 15, 2017 - Flu Can Have Dangerous Domino Effect on Older Adults: MedlinePlus Health News
December 15, 2017 - A daily cup of hot tea may lower glaucoma risk
December 15, 2017 - New blood test accurately forecasts advanced heart failure patients’ survival after surgery
December 15, 2017 - Study finds improvements in survivals rates of individuals with kidney failure
December 15, 2017 - Rare gene mutation gives rise to low sensitivity to pain
December 15, 2017 - Older Women Do Well with New Breast Cancer Drugs
December 15, 2017 - Joint damage in healthy military recruits may mimic spondyloarthropathies
December 15, 2017 - Researchers examine link between tumor mutational burden and response to immune checkpoint therapy
December 15, 2017 - Nanotextured surfaces kill bacteria without harming mammalian cells
December 15, 2017 - Ketamine more effective than common sedative in reducing suicidal thoughts
December 15, 2017 - Scientists engineer light-emitting plant
December 15, 2017 - Medicare fails to recover hundreds of millions of dollars in lab overcharges
December 15, 2017 - IPM begins first clinical trial of vaginal rings to prevent HIV in women
December 15, 2017 - Telemedicine for addiction treatment? Picture remains fuzzy
December 15, 2017 - Genetic variations may help identify people at high-risk for chronic pain after surgery
December 15, 2017 - Intersect ENT Announces FDA Approval of Sinuva (mometasone furoate) Sinus Implant, a New In-Office Treatment Option for Recurrent Nasal Polyps
December 15, 2017 - Learning the Lessons of FluMist
December 15, 2017 - Study shows brain structures make some people resilient to Alzheimer’s disease
December 15, 2017 - UQ researchers create new and improved version of ‘love hormone’
December 15, 2017 - Anti-stress compounds provide new treatment approach for diabetes and obesity
December 15, 2017 - Survey finds extremely high rate of mortality from sepsis in ICUs
December 15, 2017 - Study provides insights into molecular mechanisms regulating cellular fate of SCCs
December 15, 2017 - Researchers identify previously unknown functions of natural killer cells in the womb
December 15, 2017 - Tech at Bedtime May Mean Heavier Kids
December 15, 2017 - Meta-Analysis: Hearing Loss Linked to Dementia in Elderly
December 15, 2017 - Second Phase 3 study results for LMTX published
December 15, 2017 - Researchers team up to identify vulnerabilities of lethal parasite
December 15, 2017 - Experts call for more action on gambling-related research and treatment
Comprehensive review finds increasing number of new heart failure cases in the UK

Comprehensive review finds increasing number of new heart failure cases in the UK

image_pdfDownload PDFimage_print

Between 2002 and 2014, the number of new cases of heart failure in the UK increased by 12% – from 170727 to 190798 cases, according to the most comprehensive review of heart failure statistics in the UK, published in The Lancet. The number of new heart failure cases in 2014 was similar to the combined number of new cases of breast, prostate, lung and bowel cancer (189136 cases in 2014).

The increasing number of new heart failure cases comes as a result of population ageing and growth, while the corresponding incidence rates decreased by 7% between 2002 and 2014 (from 358 cases per 100000 people, to 332 per 100000).

Similarly, prevalence rates have remained stable over this period, but the number of existing chronic heart failure cases has increased substantially (by 23% – from 750127 to 920616 cases), which is likely to be a result of people living longer after heart failure.

Heart failure means the heart is less able to pump blood around the body. This occurs after the heart becomes damaged, typically as a result of a heart attack, high blood pressure or cardiomyopathy.

The results illustrate the successes of prevention measures, such as public health measures to reduce common cardiovascular risk factors (such as smoking cessation or improved diet), and improvements in clinical care (such as better management of heart attacks, hypertension or diabetes), but also demonstrate the vast impending burden for healthcare resources in the UK.

“Our findings have important implications for healthcare resource planning and prevention strategies, as the number of people affected by heart failure grows and places an ever-greater burden on health services,” says Professor Kazem Rahimi, The George Institute for Global Health, the University of Oxford, UK. “To counter this, we need stronger public health action in disease prevention, improved resource planning, and efficient and effective care for newly-diagnosed patients and those surviving heart failure.”

The study is the largest investigation of heart failure incidence to link data from primary and secondary care to capture the full burden of heart disease, and distinguish between new and existing cases of heart failure. It reviews the medical records of more than 3.9 million patients between January 2002 and December 2014, including people newly diagnosed and people living with heart failure during that period.

The researchers looked at patients’ medical and social factors, such as blood pressure, BMI, whether they smoked, and any other chronic conditions they had, as well as socioeconomic status, ethnicity and where they lived.

The results highlight important changes in the types of people facing heart failure over time. For example, the average age of people facing heart failure has increased from 76.5 to 77 years old, and the rate of new cases in the very elderly (people aged over 85 years) increased (by 8%, from 3926 cases per 100000 people in 2002, to 4244 per 100000 in 2014). Comparatively, the proportion of new cases decreased across most other age groups – except in people aged under 55 years, where the rates were too low to be able to compare how they changed over time. The authors explain that this could be a result of it being more difficult to manage symptoms in very elderly people.

There was also a substantial increase in the number of other chronic conditions patients had, indicating that treatment of heart failure is becoming more complex, further increasing burden on health services.

Overall, the number of other chronic conditions increased from an average of 3.4 conditions in 2002, to 5.4 in 2014, with an increasing number of people having three or more other conditions (68% of patients in 2002, compared with 87% in 2014). The authors note that this increase in other conditions may be due to several factors, such as population ageing, more disease screening programmes, greater awareness from doctors, and changes in types of risk factor.

The study quantifies the magnitude of socioeconomic inequalities in heart failure – with people from the most deprived backgrounds being 61% more likely to experience heart failure than people from the most affluent backgrounds – and also illustrates stark differences in people’s age at diagnosis and levels of other chronic conditions.

Overall, people from the most deprived backgrounds were around 3.5 years younger when they had heart failure than the most affluent (74.5 years old vs 77.8 years, respectively). This gap in age also widened between 2002-2014, with average age at diagnosis reducing by almost half a year in the most deprived, while it increased by approximately 2.5 years in the most affluent groups.

In addition, the proportion of patients presenting with three or more other chronic conditions ranged from 81% for the most deprived, to 77% for the least deprived group.

The authors calculate that if these inequities could be removed, there would be 31810 fewer heart failure cases annually in the UK.

“The disparities we have identified in the UK point to a potentially preventable nature of heart failure that still needs to be tackled, and to potential opportunities for more targeted and equitable prevention strategies,” says Professor Rahimi. “Achieving equal access and use of healthcare is an important goal, and in this instance could help to tackle the biological, environmental and behavioral risk factors that put people from more deprived background at greater risk of heart failure.”

With many other populations ageing, the authors say that their findings could be applicable to many other developed countries.

They also note some limitations, including that some of the findings coincide with the introduction of a national care monitoring program (the Quality and Outcomes Framework which was introduced between 2004-2006, while this study ran from 2002-2014) and this may explain some of the variation observed in these years.

The data used did not specify the type of heart failure patients faced, and the study relied on the accuracy of people’s medical records.

Writing in a linked Comment, Dr Faiez Zannad, Université de Lorraine, France, says:

Estimates of heart failure incidence and prevalence are difficult to generate. Accurate epidemiological estimates of heart failure, however, are crucial to ensure resources are appropriately and adequately allocated to treat patients with existing disease, and to inform prevention methods among those at risk… Despite their similar epidemiology, and worse survival for patients with heart failure compared with many forms of cancer, there is a continued disparity between the diseases in terms of research investment, focused prevention, and societal awareness. Perhaps these data will stimulate change and encourage heart failure to be addressed as an equal priority with cancer.

Source:

http://www.thelancet.com/

Tagged with:

About author

Related Articles