Breaking News
August 17, 2018 - Report discusses whether all newborns should undergo genetic sequencing
August 17, 2018 - UCR receives 2018 Inspiring Programs in STEM Award from INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine
August 17, 2018 - Researchers publish new paper on developing vaccine candidates for Helminthic parasites
August 17, 2018 - Researchers develop new method to diagnose broad range of cancers using malaria protein
August 17, 2018 - Female mosquitoes quickly evolve selective mating behavior when faced with threats
August 17, 2018 - FDA Grants Breakthrough Therapy Designation to Daiichi Sankyo’s FLT3 Inhibitor Quizartinib for Relapsed/Refractory FLT3-ITD AML
August 17, 2018 - Resistance training and exercise motivation go hand-in-hand
August 17, 2018 - A lesson for future doctors: Listen to and learn from your patients
August 17, 2018 - NUS study discovers a bidirectional regulator and shines light on A-to-I RNA editing in cancer cells
August 17, 2018 - Research shows link between high blood levels of omega-3s and better brain function in children
August 17, 2018 - Researchers propose new theory for how rare gene mutations cause Alzheimer’s disease
August 17, 2018 - Digital psychiatric therapy can ‘rewire’ the brain in children with ADHD, study shows
August 17, 2018 - Psychologist to assess how the brain maintains precise short-term and long-term memories
August 17, 2018 - Eating white button mushrooms could improve regulation of glucose in the liver
August 17, 2018 - Scientists identify mutational signatures in ovarian cancer
August 17, 2018 - Sun Pharma receives U.S. FDA approval for CEQUA to treat patients with dry eye disease
August 17, 2018 - Teva Announces Updated Indication and Vial Presentation for Granix (tbo-filgrastim) Injection in United States
August 17, 2018 - Study shows DNA methylation related to liver disease among obese patients
August 17, 2018 - Life on the border: Back at Stanford, ready to pitch in
August 17, 2018 - New device for accurately placing hemodialysis catheters on kidney patients
August 17, 2018 - New strategy accelerates, automates process of prototype molecule optimization
August 17, 2018 - Study finds role of autoimmunity in development of COPD
August 17, 2018 - Researchers transform research tool to study neuronal function
August 17, 2018 - Cognitive impairment does not equate to unhappiness in older adults
August 17, 2018 - Peer Comparisons Can Decrease Risky Prescribing Patterns
August 17, 2018 - Susceptible genes identified for childhood chronic kidney disease
August 17, 2018 - Research uncovers miscarriage cause, identifies potential targets for treatment
August 17, 2018 - Bacterial armor could be new target for antibiotics | News Center
August 17, 2018 - FDA expands approval of Vertex’ cystic fibrosis medicine to treat children aged 12 to
August 17, 2018 - Give Your Child a Head Start With Math
August 17, 2018 - Ground-breaking study tests whether rejected livers can be made viable for transplantation
August 16, 2018 - New algorithm could improve diagnosis of rare diseases | News Center
August 16, 2018 - SCHILLER introduces latest generation of ECG device, CARDIOVIT AT-102 G2
August 16, 2018 - Proper treatment, refraining from smoking can reduce heart disease risk from type 2 diabetes
August 16, 2018 - Mount Sinai study could transform treatment for patients with retinal degenerative diseases
August 16, 2018 - Penn researchers develop first mouse model of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis
August 16, 2018 - Four tips to help prevent fall allergy symptoms
August 16, 2018 - Women’s Preventive Services Initiative says screen all women annually for urinary incontinence
August 16, 2018 - At Stanford, patient discovers the source of her headaches, nausea | News Center
August 16, 2018 - To Prevent Injuries in Young Baseball Players, Chris Ahmad Reaches Out to Parents
August 16, 2018 - Restoring blood flow may be linked to longer survival in patients with critical limb ischemia
August 16, 2018 - New model of genetically engineered immune cells may help fight solid tumors
August 16, 2018 - Maternal stress increases anxious and depressive-like behaviors in female offspring
August 16, 2018 - Childhood exposure to secondhand smoke increases risk of COPD death in adulthood
August 16, 2018 - Scientists uncover key control mechanism of DNA replication
August 16, 2018 - NIH begins first-in-human trial of experimental live, attenuated Zika virus vaccine
August 16, 2018 - Two diabetes medications don’t slow progression of type 2 diabetes in youth
August 16, 2018 - 5 Questions: How Stanford research is making MRI scans safer for kids | News Center
August 16, 2018 - Columbia Celebrates 25th Anniversary of White Coat Ceremony
August 16, 2018 - Phonak’s new smallest and most discreet Virto B-Titanium hearing aid
August 16, 2018 - New project aims to study growth of water-based microorganisms
August 16, 2018 - Immune cell found to play important role in photosensitivity
August 16, 2018 - Higher social dominance linked to faster decision-making in men
August 16, 2018 - Blood test in early pregnancy could determine a woman’s later risk for gestational diabetes
August 16, 2018 - New research confirms link between DDT exposure and autism
August 16, 2018 - Neurodevelopmental Anomalies, Birth Defects Linked to Zika ID’d
August 16, 2018 - Risk of heart failure up in ALVSD patients with diabetes
August 16, 2018 - Exercise reduces symptoms and fatigue in patients with chronic kidney disease
August 16, 2018 - Study reveals role of RUNX proteins in DNA repair
August 16, 2018 - New research finds no harm from average salt consumption
August 16, 2018 - Researchers develop new way of testing bacterial resistance to antibiotics
August 16, 2018 - Magnetic gene in aquarium fish could open doors to treatment for epilepsy, Parkinson’s
August 16, 2018 - Five tips for successful long-term breastfeeding
August 16, 2018 - Researchers identify brain networks involved in object naming
August 16, 2018 - Promoting HPV Vaccine Doesn’t Prompt Risky Sex by Teens: Study
August 16, 2018 - Treating Rheumatoid Arthritis: Search for a Cure
August 16, 2018 - Research shows in the long run, charcoal toothpaste likely won’t whiten teeth
August 16, 2018 - Seattle Children’s opens new clinic to provide convenient access to pediatric specialty care services
August 16, 2018 - Curious case of the lost contact lens
August 16, 2018 - GN Hearing unveils world’s first Premium-Plus hearing aid
August 16, 2018 - Parental life span linked with increased longevity and health in daughters
August 16, 2018 - Health leaders reveal ten most important medicines in NHS history
August 16, 2018 - Mobile health devices diagnose hidden heart condition in at-risk populations
August 16, 2018 - When it comes to shedding pounds, it pays to think big
August 16, 2018 - Liva Healthcare announces appointment of Thomas Cooke as clinical services manager in the UK
August 16, 2018 - New digital pharmacy aims to help people living with chronic care conditions
August 16, 2018 - Preventing ACL injuries in high school athletes
August 16, 2018 - Experts provide insight into novel concepts and approaches for stroke rehabilitation
August 16, 2018 - Scientists reverse congenital blindness in mouse model
August 16, 2018 - Study shows link between use of benzodiazepines and increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease
Innovative nanoparticle-based approach to fight myocardial infarction

Innovative nanoparticle-based approach to fight myocardial infarction

image_pdfDownload PDFimage_print

How can damaged cardiac tissue following a heart attack best be treated with replacement muscle cells? A research team under the supervision of the University of Bonn is now presenting an innovative method on mice: Muscle replacement cells, which are to take over the function of the damaged tissue, are loaded with magnetic nanoparticles. These nanoparticle-loaded cells are then injected into the damaged heart muscle and held in place by a magnet, causing the cells to engraft better onto the existing tissue. Using the animal model, the scientists show that this leads to a significant improvement in heart function. The specialist journal “Biomaterials” presents the results in advance online, the print version will be published in the near future.

In a heart attack, clots usually lead to persistent circulatory problems in parts of the heart muscle, which then cause heart muscle cells to die. Attempts have been made for some time to revitalize the damaged heart tissue with replacement cells. “However, most of the cells are pushed out of the puncture channel during the injection due to the pumping action of the beating heart”, explains Prof. Dr. Wilhelm Röll from the Department of Cardiac Surgery at University Hospital Bonn. Therefore, only a few spare cells remain in the heart muscle, which means that repair is limited.

With an interdisciplinary team, Prof. Röll tested an innovative approach on how to ensure that the injected replacement cells remain in the desired location and engraft onto the heart tissue. The experiments were performed on mice that had previously suffered a heart attack. In order to be able to better follow the cardiac muscle replacement EGFP expressing cells obtained from fetal mouse hearts or mouse stem cells were employed. These fluorescent muscle cells were loaded with tiny magnetic nanoparticles and injected through a fine cannula into the damaged heart tissue of the mice.

In the magnetic field, the nanoparticle-loaded replacement cells remain in place

In some of the rodents treated this way, a magnet placed at a distance of a few millimeters from the surface of the heart ensured that a large part of the nanoparticle-loaded replacement cells remained at the desired location. “Without a magnet, about a quarter of the added cells remained in the heart tissue, with a magnet, about 60 percent of them stayed in place”, reports Dr. Annika Ottersbach, who was a PhD student in Prof. Röll’s team during the project. Ten minutes under the influence of the magnetic field were already sufficient to keep a significant proportion of nanoparticle-loaded muscle cells at the target site. Even days after the procedure, the injected cells remained in place and gradually attached themselves to the existing tissue.

“This is surprising, especially since the infarct tissue is relatively undersupplied due to poor perfusion”, says Prof. Röll. Under the influence of the magnet, the replacement muscle cells did not die as frequently, engrafted better and multiplied more. The researchers investigated the reasons for the improved growth: It was found that these implanted heart muscle cells were packed more densely and could survive better thanks to the more intensive cell-cell interaction. Moreover, the gene activity of many survival functions, such as for cellular respiration, was higher than without a magnet in these replacement cells.

The researchers also demonstrated that cardiac function significantly improved in mice that were treated with nanoparticle muscle cells in combination with a magnet. “After two weeks, seven times as many replacement muscle cells survived, and after two months, four times as many compared to conventional implantation technology”, reports Prof. Röll. Given the lifespan of mice of a maximum of two years, this is a surprisingly lasting effect.

In the research group 917 “Nanoparticle-based targeting of gene and cell-based therapies” funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Foundation), a wide range of disciplines worked together, ranging from medicine, physics and engineering to biology. “This interdisciplinary approach facilitated the unusually broad spectrum and depth of the investigations”, says Prof. Röll. The scientists are convinced that this technology can potentially also be transferred to humans. Prof. Röll: “However, there is still a long way to go, and intensive further research is required before this method can be used in a clinical setting.”

Source:

https://www.uni-bonn.de/news/288-2017

Tagged with:

About author

Related Articles