Breaking News
August 14, 2018 - American Heart Association Urges Screen Time Limits for Youth
August 14, 2018 - Brief interventions during routine care reduce alcohol use among men with HIV
August 14, 2018 - New genome analysis could identify people at higher risk of common deadly diseases
August 14, 2018 - NIH grant for Mount Sinai to study use of inhaled corticosteroids for treatment of sickle cell disease
August 14, 2018 - Daicel supplies free nanodiamond samples to international researchers
August 14, 2018 - Switching anti-psychotic drugs in first-episode schizophrenia patients does not improve clinical outcomes
August 14, 2018 - Study to examine whether modulating gut bacteria can improve cardiac function in heart failure patients
August 14, 2018 - One out of two children not getting enough nutrients needed for their health
August 14, 2018 - Mono-antiplatelet therapy after aortic heart valve replacements may work as well as two drugs
August 14, 2018 - Aid-in-dying patient chooses his last day
August 14, 2018 - Exercise Really Can Chase Away the Blues, to a Point
August 14, 2018 - Surgical mesh implants may cause autoimmune disorders
August 14, 2018 - Researchers develop revolutionary zebrafish model to gain more insight into bone diseases
August 14, 2018 - Researchers discover secret communication hotline between breast cancers and normal cells
August 14, 2018 - Study examines how a person adapts to visual field loss after stroke
August 14, 2018 - Researchers show how specialized nucleic acid-based nanostructures could help target cancer cells
August 14, 2018 - Reducing opioid prescriptions for one operation can also spill over to other procedures
August 14, 2018 - E-cigarettes not so safe but still better than cigarettes
August 14, 2018 - Researchers find link between common ‘harmless’ virus and cardiovascular damage
August 14, 2018 - Initiation of PIMs associated with higher risk of fracture-specific hospitalizations and mortality
August 14, 2018 - Genetically modified mosquitoes and special bed nets help tackle deadly diseases
August 14, 2018 - Advances in treating hep C lead to new option for transplant patients
August 14, 2018 - Study finds quality of doctor-patient discussions about lung cancer screening to be ‘poor’
August 14, 2018 - MSU researchers uncover the effects of aging on regenerative ability of kidneys
August 14, 2018 - Better conditioning, throwing mechanics can help reduce elbow injuries in young baseball pitchers
August 14, 2018 - Brain game doesn’t offer brain gain
August 14, 2018 - Reproductive choices facing women with disabilities require careful consideration
August 14, 2018 - Scientists pinpoint the cause of a rare childhood seizure disorder
August 14, 2018 - Lumpectomy plus radiation associated with reduced risk of breast cancer death, study finds
August 14, 2018 - UAB study shows how ion channel differentiates newborn and mature neurons in the brain
August 14, 2018 - Experts highlight key knowledge gaps that need to be addressed in Ebola vaccine research
August 14, 2018 - Discovery could lead to new drugs against infection and inflammation
August 14, 2018 - Infection Prevention Differs Between Small, Large Hospitals
August 14, 2018 - Mom still matters—In study, young adults tended to prioritize parents over friends
August 14, 2018 - Deep brain stimulation might benefit those with severe alcoholism, preliminary studies show
August 14, 2018 - Study finds increased rate of repeat pregnancies in women with intellectual and developmental disabilities
August 14, 2018 - Lighter sedation fails to reduce risk of postoperative delirium in older patients
August 13, 2018 - Asking better questions about person’s memory could improve doctors’ understanding of patients
August 13, 2018 - U.S. Trauma Doctors Push for Stricter Gun Controls
August 13, 2018 - Asthma and flu: a double whammy
August 13, 2018 - 5 Questions: Donna Zulman on engaging high-need patients in intensive outpatient programs | News Center
August 13, 2018 - Behavioral Nudges Lead to Drop in Prescriptions of Potent Antipsychotic
August 13, 2018 - Potential New Class of Drugs May Reduce Cardiovascular Risk by Targeting Gut Microbes
August 13, 2018 - How to get your kids to eat better
August 13, 2018 - The importance of hearing your patients
August 13, 2018 - Transmission of F. tularensis unlikely to happen through the food chain
August 13, 2018 - Researchers discover epigenetic mechanism underlying ischemic cardiomyopathy
August 13, 2018 - Adolescent health programs receive only a tiny share of international aid, finds research
August 13, 2018 - Fracture risk increases by 30% after gastric bypass, study shows
August 13, 2018 - Quality-improvement project to standardize feeding practices helps micro preemies gain weight
August 13, 2018 - Long-term cannabinoid exposure impairs memory, study shows
August 13, 2018 - New intervention to reduce risk of HIV in young transgender women
August 13, 2018 - Japan human trial tests iPS cell treatment for Parkinson’s
August 13, 2018 - Altered nitrogen metabolism may contribute to emergence of new cancer mutations
August 13, 2018 - Cycling provides greatest health benefits, study finds
August 13, 2018 - Scientists discover biomarker for kidney cancer
August 13, 2018 - New test predicts the risk of serious disease before symptoms appear
August 13, 2018 - Cianna Medical receives FDA 510(k) clearance to extend indication of SCOUT reflector for use in soft tissue localization
August 13, 2018 - Ground-breaking discovery offers new hope for treatment of Alzheimer’s, other neurological diseases
August 13, 2018 - Medical nutrition therapy provided by RDNs benefits patients with chronic kidney disease
August 13, 2018 - Prenatal Tdap vaccination not linked with increased risk of autism in children, study shows
August 13, 2018 - One-Third of Canadian Patients Get Hip Fx Repair Within 24 Hours
August 13, 2018 - ANA (Antinuclear Antibody) Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information
August 13, 2018 - Traffic jams in the brain
August 13, 2018 - NIH awards $6.5 million to establish multi-institution biomedical technology resource center
August 13, 2018 - New marker in the blood could help predict person’s risk of developing kidney cancer
August 13, 2018 - New biomarker may provide clues to create diagnostic tool for hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure
August 13, 2018 - Oxidative Stress Hampers Blood Vessel Dilation in Men
August 13, 2018 - Parents’ Religious Beliefs May Affect Kids’ Suicide Risk: Study
August 13, 2018 - Measure of belly fat in older adults is linked with cognitive impairment
August 13, 2018 - FDA permits marketing of first mobile medical app for contraceptive use to prevent pregnancy
August 13, 2018 - NUS scientists develop new technology to customize optimal drug ‘cocktail’ for myeloma patients
August 13, 2018 - Disordered eating behaviors up for overweight young adults
August 13, 2018 - Connection between Alzheimer’s disease and degenerative eye diseases
August 13, 2018 - Employer expectation of checking email during nonwork hours affects health of workers and families
August 13, 2018 - Rotavirus vaccination reduces infant diarrhea deaths by 34% in rural Malawi
August 13, 2018 - Approval of drug derived from cannabis not necessarily a win for weed
August 13, 2018 - Study shows COPD risk in women with asthma can be reduced
August 13, 2018 - FIND and genedrive announce study agreement to evaluate HCV ID Kit
August 13, 2018 - One in two people putting their eye health at risk during summer, says eye research charity
New Atopic Dermatitis Yardstick provides practical guidance and management insights

New Atopic Dermatitis Yardstick provides practical guidance and management insights

image_pdfDownload PDFimage_print

Patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) – also known as eczema – often face a tough, uphill battle for treatment. Symptoms include severe itching, scaly rashes, extreme dry skin and inflammation. Those who suffer from AD spend sleepless, itchy nights fearing they have nowhere to turn and their symptoms may never resolve. This creates therapeutic challenges for clinicians treating AD

According to a new yardstick published in Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, the scientific journal of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) treatment for AD has changed a lot in the last few years. New treatments – including new drugs – are now available and can offer relief.

“The Atopic Dermatitis Yardstick was written by AD experts who are allergists and dermatologists because we want physicians who see patients with AD on a regular basis to know there are effective treatment options available,” says allergist Mark Boguniewicz, MD, ACAAI Fellow and lead author of the yardstick. “In the yardstick, we cover the challenges and barriers to treatment success. We offer definitions of disease severity, review treatment failures, address treatment in a step wise fashion and cover the emerging science and implications for new therapies.” The yardstick has practical recommendations for physicians about which medications are appropriate at which stage of diagnosis.

Itching is the hallmark of AD, and the cycle of itching and scratching makes the condition worse because it causes damage to the skin and often creates secondary infections, which can be serious. AD patients are at increased risk, not only for skin infections, but, according to a recent study, also for multi-organ and systemic infections. Patients with AD can present with a range of disease severity, from mild intermittent disease to severe difficult-to-control disease.

“All patients must keep their skin highly moisturized, regardless of the activity or severity of their disease” says allergist Luz Fonacier, MD, ACAAI board member and co-author of the yardstick. “We emphasize throughout the yardstick that even when patients step up to stronger medications, they should still continue basic treatment of bathing with warm water followed immediately with heavy moisturization, i.e. soak and seal.”

The last few years have seen the introduction of targeted therapies, also known as “precision medicine”. Two new medications have recently been approved for AD. The first, crisaborole, is an ointment that reduces itching, redness and swelling of the skin. It is the first anti-inflammatory medication to be approved for the treatment of mild to moderate AD in more than 15 years. It is approved for patients 2 years of age or older. Dupilumab, the second new medication, is a biologic therapy given by injection for patients 18 years or older with moderate to severe AD who haven’t responded to, or can’t use topical medications.

“There are effective medications available that help relieve AD symptoms and now can also target some of the underlying mechanisms of the disease,” says Dr. Fonacier. “People with AD have been frustrated by the limitations of existing treatments. We’re very excited by the new medications which were developed based on better understanding of atopic dermatitis. We expect additional therapies to be approved soon. Allergists have the right training and expertise to diagnose AD, and to offer relief with the right treatments. We’re glad we can add these treatments to our arsenal of weapons to combat the symptoms of AD.”


Explore further:
New treatments help those with mild, moderate and severe eczema

Journal reference:
Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology

Provided by:
American College of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology

Tagged with:

About author

Related Articles