Breaking News
January 19, 2019 - New anti-inflammatory compound acts as ‘surge protector’ to reduce cancer growth
January 19, 2019 - Significant flaws found in recently released forensic software
January 19, 2019 - New Leash on Life? Staying Slim Keeps Pooches Happy, Healthy
January 19, 2019 - Men and women remember pain differently
January 19, 2019 - Rising air pollution linked with increased ER visits for breathing problems
January 19, 2019 - Study uses local data to model food consumption patterns among Seattle residents
January 19, 2019 - The brain’s cerebellum plays role in controlling reward and social behaviors, study shows
January 19, 2019 - Relationship between nurse work environment and patient safety
January 19, 2019 - Pioneering surgery restores movement to children paralyzed by acute flaccid myelitis
January 19, 2019 - Genetic variants linked with risk tolerance and risky behaviors
January 19, 2019 - New research provides better understanding of our early human ancestors
January 19, 2019 - First-ever tailored reporting guidance to improve patient care and outcomes
January 19, 2019 - 4.6 percent of Massachusetts residents have opioid use disorder
January 19, 2019 - New study suggests vital exhaustion as risk factor for dementia
January 19, 2019 - New antibiotic discovery heralds breakthrough in the fight against drug-resistant bacteria
January 19, 2019 - Ural Federal University scientists synthesize a group of multi-purpose fluorophores
January 19, 2019 - Researchers identify new therapeutic target in the fight against chronic liver diseases
January 19, 2019 - Preparation, characterization of Soyasapogenol B loaded onto functionalized MWCNTs
January 19, 2019 - FDA Approves Ontruzant (trastuzumab-dttb), a Biosimilar to Herceptin
January 19, 2019 - Tobacco use linked with higher use of opioids and sedatives
January 19, 2019 - Study delves deeper into developmental dyslexia
January 19, 2019 - Anti-vaccination movement one of the top health threats in 2019 says WHO
January 19, 2019 - Newly developed risk score more effective at identifying type 1 diabetes
January 19, 2019 - Highly effective protocol to prepare cannabis samples for THC/CBD analysis
January 19, 2019 - Prinston Pharmaceutical Inc. Issues Voluntary Nationwide Recall of Irbesartan and Irbesartan HCTZ Tablets Due to Detection of a Trace Amount of Unexpected Impurity, N-Nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) in the Products
January 19, 2019 - How does solid stress from brain tumors cause neuronal loss, neurologic dysfunction?
January 19, 2019 - $14.7 million partnership to supercharge vaccine development
January 19, 2019 - Ian Fotheringham receives Charles Tennant Memorial Lecture award
January 19, 2019 - Brain vital signs detect neurophysiological impairments in players with concussions
January 19, 2019 - Lack of job and poor housing conditions increased likelihood of people attending A&E
January 19, 2019 - Novel targeted drug delivery system improves conventional cancer treatments
January 19, 2019 - Rutgers study finds gene responsible for spread of prostate cancer
January 19, 2019 - Complications Higher Than Expected for Invasive Lung Tests
January 19, 2019 - 3-D printed implant promotes nerve cell growth to treat spinal cord injury
January 19, 2019 - Automated texts lead to improved outcomes after total knee or hip replacement surgery
January 19, 2019 - Poor cardiorespiratory fitness could increase risk of future heart attack, finds new study
January 19, 2019 - Drinking soft drinks while exercising in hot weather may increase risk of kidney disease
January 19, 2019 - Formlabs 3D prints anatomical models
January 19, 2019 - Heart-Healthy Living Also Wards Off Type 2 Diabetes
January 19, 2019 - Teaching Kids to Be Smart About Social Media (for Parents)
January 19, 2019 - Metabolite produced by gut microbiota from pomegranates reduces inflammatory bowel disease
January 19, 2019 - Researchers examine how spray from showers and toilets expose us to disease causing bacteria
January 19, 2019 - Behavioral experiments confirm that additional neurons improve brain function
January 19, 2019 - New study compares performance of real-time infectious disease forecasting models
January 19, 2019 - Obesity can be risk factor for developing renal cell carcinoma, confirms study
January 19, 2019 - New regulation designs on cigarette packs direct smokers’ attention to health warnings
January 19, 2019 - QIAGEN receives first companion diagnostic approval in Japan
January 19, 2019 - Study explores role of Dunning-Kruger effect in anti-vaccine attitudes
January 19, 2019 - Newly identified subset of immune cells may be key to fighting chronic inflammation
January 19, 2019 - New immune response regulators discovered
January 18, 2019 - Poor blood oxygenation during sleep predicts chance of heart-related death
January 18, 2019 - First international consensus on the diagnosis and management of fibromuscular dysplasia
January 18, 2019 - Rapid resistance gene sequencing technology can hasten identification of antibiotic-resistant bacteria
January 18, 2019 - Researchers develop artificial enzymatic pathway for synthesizing isoprenoids in E. coli
January 18, 2019 - Scientists advise caution in immunotherapy research
January 18, 2019 - How children across the world develop language
January 18, 2019 - Columbia Medical Student Receives McDonogh Scholarship
January 18, 2019 - Secretive ‘Rebate Trap’ Keeps Generic Drugs For Diabetes And Other Ills Out Of Reach
January 18, 2019 - Plant based diet could be the best option for the planet says commission
January 18, 2019 - New conservation practice could reduce nitrogen from agricultural drainage, study shows
January 18, 2019 - UIC researchers receive $1.7 million NCI grant to study Southeast Asian fruit
January 18, 2019 - New study determines the fate of DNA derived from genetically modified food
January 18, 2019 - Scientists develop new gene therapy that prevents axon destruction in mice
January 18, 2019 - Study finds critically low HPV vaccination rates among younger adolescents in the U.S.
January 18, 2019 - Brain cells involved in memory play key role in reducing future eating behavior
January 18, 2019 - Risk for Conversion of MS Varies With Different Therapies
January 18, 2019 - Investigational cream may help patients with inflammatory skin disease
January 18, 2019 - Medical school news office receives six writing awards | News Center
January 18, 2019 - County By County, Researchers Link Opioid Deaths To Drugmakers’ Marketing
January 18, 2019 - Research reveals risk for developing more than one mental health disorder
January 18, 2019 - Scientists discover a dramatic pattern of bone growth in female mice
January 18, 2019 - Study finds link between lengthy periods of undisturbed maternal sleep and stillbirths
January 18, 2019 - New nuclear medicine method could improve detection of primary and metastatic melanoma
January 18, 2019 - Combination therapy shows high efficacy in treating people with leishmaniasis and HIV
January 18, 2019 - Health Tip: Don’t Ignore Changes in Skin Color
January 18, 2019 - Dietary Recommendations for Healthy Children
January 18, 2019 - Eliminating the latent reservoir of HIV
January 18, 2019 - Pain From The Government Shutdown Spreads. This Time It’s Food Stamps
January 18, 2019 - Newly discovered regulatory mechanism helps control fat metabolism
January 18, 2019 - New rapid blood tests could speed up TB diagnosis, save the NHS money
Incidence of stroke has risen steadily among marijuana users, show studies

Incidence of stroke has risen steadily among marijuana users, show studies

image_pdfDownload PDFimage_print

WHAT: 11th World Stroke Congress brings together leading international stroke experts and an unparalleled scientific program covering epidemiology, prevention, acute care, rehabilitation and recovery in 100s of sessions and oral posters. Congress is attended by stroke professionals, researchers, policy makers, survivors and caregivers from around the world. #worldstroke2018

WHERE: Montreal, Canada, Palais des Congrès

WHEN: October 17 – 20, 2018

MEDIA OPPORTUNTIES: Stroke experts and people with lived experience of stroke will be available for interviews.

TODAY’S CONGRESS HIGHLIGHTS

Late-breaking trials

  • A study of Nationwide Implementation of Mechanical Thrombectomy in Germany will be presented by Dr. Christian Weimar (8:35 am, Hall H). The study found that a wide range of both IVT and MT rates in German ischemic stroke patients indicates the need for further improvement of access to acute recanalization therapies in many, mainly rural, regions.
  • Dr. David Gladstone of the University of Toronto and Sunnybrook Research Institute will present the results of a study evaluating the use of the drug rivaroxaban versus acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) to prevent strokes in patients with an enlarged left atrium of the heart. The results showed some potential benefit from rivaroxaban but caution was urged. “We are seeing a very intriguing signal here, and it has biological plausibility, but it is going to require independent validation before making any changes to practice recommendations,” Dr. Gladstone said. (8:53 am, Hall H)

HOT TOPIC: Review of U.S. hospital statistics shows rise in stroke incidence among marijuana users from 2010-14 while overall stroke prevalence remained stable

A five-year study of hospital statistics from the United States shows that the incidence of stroke has risen steadily among marijuana users even though the overall rate of stroke remained constant over the same period.

The study, presented today during the third day of the World Stroke Congress in Montreal, looked at U.S. hospital statistics from 2010 to 2014. It examined a total of 2.3 million hospitalizations among people who used marijuana recreationally. Of these, 32,231, or 1.4 percent, had a stroke including 19,452 with acute ischemic stroke (AIS).

Over the five years studied, the rate of stroke of all types among marijuana users increased from 1.3 percent to 1.5 percent. The rate of AIS increased from 0.7 percent to 0.9 percent. During the same five-year period, the prevalence of stroke among all patients was stable.

As result, the researchers conclude that these growing trends of stroke among marijuana users “warrant further prospective studies to evaluate the marijuana-stroke association amidst legalization of recreational use.”

The researchers noted in introducing their study that marijuana “has a potential link to stroke owing to cerebrovascular effects of cannabinoids.”

HOT TOPIC: Young stroke survivors at high long-term risk of adverse outcomes

A significant percentage of strokes – estimated from 8-21 per cent – affect adults under age 45. A Canadian study by senior author Dr. Richard Swartz and his team sought to determine what the future might hold for these young patients who show no early complications from their initial stroke.

This analysis of more than 26,000 young stroke survivors using data from the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) showed that, although absolute rates of adverse events including recurrent stroke, heart attack, death and institutionalization were low among young clinically stable stroke patients, these patients still showed 7 times the risk of having an adverse complication one year after their initial stroke compared to only twice the risk among older patients. After accounting for other vascular risk factors, long-term risks remained at almost 3 times that of young controls, even for these patients who were clinically stable and had no early complications during what is considered the high-risk period immediately after a stroke.

“This study shows us that even young stroke and TIA patients who are clinically stable after their stroke remain at a significant risk of adverse events, like another stroke, death or requiring long- term care,” said lead study author Dr. Jodi Edwards of the Brain and Heart Nexus Research Program at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute. “This is important as it highlights the need for guidelines and strategies for long-term aggressive prevention to reduce stroke risk in young stroke patients.”

HOT TOPIC: Three studies highlight changes in stroke care in Quebec

With the World Stroke Congress being held in Montreal it is appropriate that there are three presentations concerning the evaluation of different aspects of stroke care in the province of Quebec. The lead author is Dr. Laurie Lambert, Coordinator of the Cardiovascular Evaluation Unit of Quebec’s Institut national d’excellence en santé et en services sociaux (INESSS).

The first presentation evaluates changes in processes and quality of care in Québec’s comprehensive stroke centres following a province-wide field evaluation in 2013-14 and the development and implementation of a plan to promote best practices by the Ministry of Health. It found that times to initiating treatment improved, with the proportion treated with thrombolysis in less than 60 minutes increasing from 47 to 80 per cent and that more patients in these centres were admitted to a stroke unit: 91 per cent in 2016-17 compared to 75 per cent previously.

The second presentation compares care pathways in the four regional networks and the third compares treatment delays for thrombectomy between direct admission and inter-hospital transfer patients. For transferred patients, median first door-to-puncture time was 171 minutes (142-224). For patients directly admitted to a comprehensive stroke centre, the median first door-to-puncture was 69 minutes (50-100).

HOT TOPIC: Canadian researchers identify age and sex differences in stroke care

Two studies by Toronto researchers look at age and sex differences in stroke care in Canada. One study looking at data from 2003-16 concluded that in-hospital deaths from stroke decreased for all patients, but the group most at risk is older women.

The second study by the same researchers was presented on Oct. 18 and looked at data from 2014-16. It concluded younger adults are more likely to get alteplase clot-busting medication, access stroke units and be discharged home independently than older adults, and women of all ages are less likely to be discharged home independently.

HOT TOPICS: Other presentations of interest on the third day of the Congress:

  • A Canadian study mapped stroke care facilities across Canada using geospatial software to evaluate access by distance and drive times. It concludes that most Canadians live within a 300-km drive to prevention services (95.5 per cent), endovascular therapy (79.1 per cent) and rehabilitation services (97.8 per cent); however due to Canada’s geography, weather and resource challenges in more rural and remote communities, many of the eligible patients are not able to reach stroke hospitals in time to make a difference in their recovery and are left with lasting deficits from stroke
  • A 30-minute platform discussion in the Exhibition Hall at 10:05 am brings together world experts to discuss how to put people living with stroke and non-communicable diseases (NCDs) at the centre of healthcare. If the NCD response is to be successful, it is imperative to leave no-one behind. Patients are by definition at the very centre of healthcare, and people living with and affected by stroke and NCDs will be essential to accelerate the realization of global NCD targets. People living with NCDs, their carers, and NCD survivors must be empowered to deal with the disease in the long term. Furthermore, they need to shape the NCD response and to give an effective response against stigma and discrimination faced by people living with stroke. This applies from the level of advocacy and policy development, through to design, implementation, and evaluation of programmes. Panelists include Dr. Mayowa Owolabi, Professor of Neurology, and Dean, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, University of Ibadan (Nigeria), Jon Barrick, President, Stroke Alliance for Europe (SAFE) (UK), Stephanie Mohl, Vice President, American Stroke Association (USA) and Jennifer Monaghan, stroke survivor, Living with Stroke program (Canada). For live updates, follow @ncdallliance and #enoughNCDs
  • A discussion on chronic and end-of-life care for people with stroke and NCDs takes place in the Exhibition Hall at 12:40. NCDs are typically chronic conditions which require particular care towards the end of life. The WHO estimates that 40 million people are in need of palliative care each year – but that 86% do not receive it. The greatest gaps can be observed in developing country settings. Once implemented, it is imperative that end-of-life care services are holistic, extending far beyond physical treatment. The need for proper psychological and spiritual support for the person at the centre of the care, and for those around them, cannot be underestimated. Panelists include Dr. Pooja Khatri, Professor of Neurology, Director of Acute Stroke, UC Health (USA), Dr. Dylan Blacquiere, Neurologist, Saint John Regional Hospital (Canada), Dr. Gilian Mead, Professor of Stroke and Elderly Care Medicine, University of Edinburgh (UK), and Rita Melifonwu, Founder and CEO, Stroke Action Nigeria (Nigeria)

11th World Stroke Congress

The 11th World Stroke Congress, being held Oct. 17-20, 2018, at the Palais des Congrès in Montreal, Quebec, brings together leading international stroke experts and an unparalleled scientific program covering epidemiology, prevention, acute care and recovery in hundreds of sessions and oral posters. The Congress is attended by stroke professionals, researchers, policy makers and people with lived experience from around the world. This is the first time the biennial Congress has been held in North America in 12 years; the 2016 Congress was held in Hyderabad, India. This year’s Congress is jointly organized by the World Stroke Organization (WSO) and the Canadian Stroke Consortium (CSC). Co-presidents are Dr. Werner Hacke, WSO President, and Dr. Mike Sharma, CSC Chair. WorldStrokeCongress.org/2018

Source:

http://www.heartandstroke.ca/

Tagged with:

About author

Related Articles