Breaking News
February 15, 2019 - Genetic variations in a fourth gene associated with higher ALL risk in Hispanic children
February 15, 2019 - Disruptive behavioral problems in kindergarten linked with lower employment earnings in adulthood
February 15, 2019 - New bioengineered device enhances the production of T-cells
February 15, 2019 - HDL proteome behaves like a tiny Velcro ball that is rolling on surfaces
February 15, 2019 - Puerto Rican children more likely to have poor or decreasing use of asthma inhalers
February 15, 2019 - Quality of patient care does not improve after physician-hospital integration
February 15, 2019 - Synopsys release new software for implant design and patient-specific planning
February 15, 2019 - 6 out of 10 hip replacements last 25 years or longer
February 15, 2019 - Health Tip: What You Should Know About Antibiotics
February 15, 2019 - New research challenges medical consensus that adenoids and tonsils significantly shrink during teenage years
February 15, 2019 - Discovery of weakness in a rare cancer could be exploited with drugs
February 15, 2019 - UVA scientists find potential explanation for mysterious cell death in Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s
February 15, 2019 - New rules requiring female athletes to lower testosterone levels are based on flawed data
February 15, 2019 - Researchers comprehensively sequence the human immune system
February 15, 2019 - Researchers study animal venoms to identify new medicines for treating diseases
February 15, 2019 - Movement of wrist bones revealed by MRI and computer modeling
February 15, 2019 - Philips introduces new premium digital X-ray room to help shorten patient wait times
February 15, 2019 - Women fare worse than men following aortic heart surgery, study finds
February 15, 2019 - High-protein and low-calorie diet helps older adults lose weight safely, shows study
February 15, 2019 - Drug microdosing effects may not measure up to big expectations
February 15, 2019 - Discharged, Dismissed: ERs Often Miss Chance To Set Overdose Survivors On ‘Better Path’
February 15, 2019 - A digitized lab environment to be showcased at smartLAB 2019
February 15, 2019 - Scientists uncover main mechanisms of fluconazole drug resistance
February 15, 2019 - New study seeks to understand how colibactin causes cancer
February 15, 2019 - Photoacoustic imaging accurately measures the temperature of deep tissues
February 15, 2019 - Large study finds no association between phthalate exposure and breast cancer risk
February 15, 2019 - New research explains presence of ‘natural’ magnetism in human cells
February 15, 2019 - Bio-Rad launches new digital PCR system and kit for monitoring treatment response in CML patients
February 15, 2019 - Scientists shed light on damaging cell effects linked to aging
February 15, 2019 - High intensity exercise may improve health by increasing gut microbiota diversity
February 15, 2019 - Apellis’ APL-2 Receives Orphan Drug Designation from the FDA for the Treatment of Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia
February 15, 2019 - Couples creating art or playing board games release ‘love hormone’
February 15, 2019 - Glimpsing The Future At Gargantuan Health Tech Showcase
February 15, 2019 - Common herbicide found to increase the risk of lymphoma
February 15, 2019 - Over-abundance of energy to cells could increase cancer risk
February 15, 2019 - Oxford Genetics appoints Jocelyne Bath as new Chief Operating Officer
February 15, 2019 - Castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer responds to combination of immune checkpoint inhibitors
February 15, 2019 - Large-scale clinical trial begins to study liver transplantation between people with HIV
February 15, 2019 - Cannabis use among adolescents linked with increased risk of depression in adulthood
February 15, 2019 - Fractures, head injuries common in electric scooter accidents, UCLA study finds
February 15, 2019 - Prenatal maternal depression has important consequences for infant temperament, study shows
February 15, 2019 - Stereotactic body radiotherapy effective in treating men with low- or intermediate-risk prostate cancer
February 15, 2019 - Zogenix Submits New Drug Application to U.S. Food & Drug Administration for Fintepla for the Treatment of Dravet Syndrome
February 15, 2019 - Certain birthmarks warrant quick treatment, pediatricians say
February 15, 2019 - New machine learning method predicts if atypical ductal hyperplasia will turn cancerous
February 15, 2019 - Whole-genome sequencing and sharing real-time data could limit spread of foodborne bacteria
February 15, 2019 - FDA warns doctor for illegally marketing unapproved implantable device
February 15, 2019 - New injury documentation tool may provide better evidence for elder abuse cases
February 15, 2019 - Physiological age is a better predictor of survival than chronological age, shows study
February 15, 2019 - New study reveals high success rate for hip and knee replacements
February 15, 2019 - Prenatal exposures to BPA may pose threat to human ovarian function
February 15, 2019 - Suspicious spots on the lungs of children with rhabdomyosarcoma do not behave like metastases
February 15, 2019 - Diet drinks daily could raise stroke risk says study
February 15, 2019 - Many Systematic Reviews Do Not Fully Report Adverse Events
February 15, 2019 - Seven tips to protect your child from burns
February 15, 2019 - Keynote speakers announced for CBD Expo MIDWEST
February 15, 2019 - New DNA methylation GrimAge tool allows you to predict lifespan and healthspan
February 15, 2019 - New AI-driven platform analyze how pathogens infect human cells
February 15, 2019 - Increased activity of EHMT2 gene deficient neurons could cause autism in humans
February 15, 2019 - Recurring UTIs may mask symptoms of bladder or kidney cancer
February 15, 2019 - Researchers conduct extensive comparison of drugs used in treating neuroendocrine tumors
February 15, 2019 - Depression prevention for pregnant women and new mothers – new recommendations
February 15, 2019 - AHA News: Are There Health Benefits From Chocolate?
February 15, 2019 - The involvement of the gut in Parkinson’s disease: hype or hope?
February 15, 2019 - New PET imaging agent may help measure efficacy or failure of hormone therapy for breast cancer
February 15, 2019 - Preventing infections could help combat antimicrobial resistance
February 15, 2019 - Study investigates the role of estrogen in controlling glucose homeostasis
February 15, 2019 - Exposure to chemical in weedkiller Roundup raises risk of some cancers, study finds
February 15, 2019 - Smoking and drinking during pregnancy – stigma drives women to secrecy
February 15, 2019 - Low FODMAP diet reduces stomach issues caused by exercise
February 15, 2019 - Novel approach uses small amounts of tissue to quantify PD-L1 expression levels in tumors
February 15, 2019 - Breast pumps could be transmitting asthma-causing bacteria in babies, finds study
February 15, 2019 - The Pistoia Alliance Launches Next Phase of Blockchain Project to Develop Life Science R&D Use Cases
February 15, 2019 - The search for environmental causes of Parkinson’s disease moves forward
February 15, 2019 - Women scientists inhibited by funding methods that favor men, researchers say
February 14, 2019 - Few primary care physicians lack enough knowledge of cancer treatment options
February 14, 2019 - Prime real estate is determined by previous owner in the squirrel world
February 14, 2019 - Discovery of a ‘master switch’ within the immune system
February 14, 2019 - Health officers with surgical training are a safe alternative for performing C-sections
February 14, 2019 - Researchers discover mechanism on how body’s antimicrobial shield regulates microbiome
Validating the Diagnosis of Depression

Validating the Diagnosis of Depression

image_pdfDownload PDFimage_print

An interview with Professor Parry Hashemi, conducted by Alina Shrourou, BSc.

In your talk at Pittcon 2018, you mentioned that depression is difficult to diagnose. Please can you outline the current issues with the serotonin hypothesis for diagnosing depression?

It’s very difficult to diagnose depression. To explain this, I like to use the analogy of what you do if you suspect that you have a condition such as diabetes – you visit your doctor who takes blood tests, from which they measure your glucose and insulin levels to deliver a definitive diagnosis. With depression, you can’t open the brain to find answers, and the chemistry of the brain is separate from the chemistry of the body.

© SARANS/Shutterstock.com

Instead, the doctor asks questions and forms an opinion based on your answers. Over the past few decades, there have been theories forwarded about brain activity during depression, and one of the major hypotheses is that serotonin is lower in the brains of people with depression. This is known as monoamine hypothesis of depression.

This fuelled the development of modern anti-depressants, and as a result, front line treatment for depression mostly consists of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, SSRIs, intended to increase serotonin levels.

However, without an effective method for measuring serotonin, it’s difficult to test that hypothesis.

Please give an overview of the research that you have been working on which led to you winning the Pittcon Achievement Award.

We had many questions regarding serotonin, and it became clear that to answer them we’d need new technologies. We worked on creating microelectrodes made from carbon that we could implant into brain tissue. Carbon is a really good material for making biological measurements because our bodies are full of it, meaning the body doesn’t have a negative immune reaction to an implanted carbon electrode, as it would to say gold or platinum, materials that aren’t present in our bodies.

We made them really small, measuring at about 1/100th or 1/1000th the diameter of a human hair. We implanted them directly into brain tissue and spent many years trying to develop different detection schemes, modifications, electrochemical parameters and physiological parameters that would allow us to measure serotonin.

Having acquired the serotonin measurements, we spent the past few years trying to figure out how to apply those to depression research, from different animal models, biochemical assays, and collaborative work with mathematicians.

What does it mean to you to win the Pittsburgh Conference Achievement Award?

I’ve been coming to this conference and attending the Pittcon Achievement Symposium for about 12 years, so it’s really fantastic to be recognised amongst the other winners.

It’s a huge honor, on both a personal and professional level, and really a milestone in my career. Research is such an unforgiving career choice sometimes. You can work hard for a long time and yet see very little result.

We’ve worked hard, and are finally making an impact in the field, which is wonderful to be recognized for. It also means so much to my mentors, and of course, my students, who are honored to have their work recognized.

In your talk, you also discussed how in inflamed synapses, we see increased histamine levels and a decrease of serotonin levels. How can these findings be used to validate the serotonin hypothesis?

It’s not the synapse that’s inflamed, rather inflammation in general. To put it in perspective, when you’re sick or some kind of bacteria enters your body, your body will have an immune reaction to it, and that’s called inflammation. The same thing happens in your brain and is called neuroinflammation. While a lot of knowledge exists on certain markers for neuroinflammation, how neuroinflammation affects neurotransmission remains a grey area.

We found that during neuroinflammation, which is very prevalent in depression and other psychiatric diseases, serotonin levels are lower. We link this to greater levels of histamine, which inversely modulates serotonin.

For the first time we could verify the serotonin hypothesis of depression and conclude that the serotonin levels were lower. We know why they’re lower, and are now examining what impact treatment really has, not just with serotonin but histamine too.

What neuroanalysis technology did you use to study the brain under healthy and disease conditions?

These were the tiny carbon fibers, and because it’s new research technology, we actually made them by hand, and It’s a real art. When people join my lab for a full year, they learn how to make these electrodes.

You take a tiny glass capillary and aspirate a tiny fiber, which are barely visible with the eye. You pull it apart under heat, so the glass forms a seal, then the hardest part is cutting that to a specific length under a microscope with a scalpel.

Once you become accomplished at that, then there’s a whole bunch of instrumentation to learn how to make and troubleshoot, since they can’t be bought. Next you have to learn about anaesthesia and brain surgery.

How translatable are your findings to the physiological response to depression seen in humans?

Most depression research occurs in mice and rats, and the big question in the field is how translatable is that to humans. There are very well-established behaviour paradigms in animals that will lead to depression phenotypes. But of course, it’s a big jump to try to compare that with a human condition that’s extremely complex.

To explore this, we’ve started working with stem cells taken from human skin, that we apply various different conditions and growth factors to, which turns them into any type of bodily cell. We work with people that can turn these into serotonin neurons, which is really cool.

The idea is that if these serotonin neurons are functioning the way that our brain serotonin neurons are, which we have some good evidence for, then we can make our measurements in a Petri dish from these cells.

From these we will know by proxy what’s happening in your brain, so these are our efforts towards making what we’ve seen in the mice translatable to humans.

How would you like to see your findings on histamine inhibition influence antidepressant drug development in the future?

So right now, in terms of antidepressant therapies and drug discovery, there’s been a loss of interest in SSRI research in developing new drugs. The major reason is because it’s very difficult to screen these drugs. There’s no chemical test for depression. There’s no chemical test for antidepressant efficacy. Drug developers have traditionally relied on behavioural tests in mice, and it turns out they’re not very reliable.

In recent years, we’ve seen quite a decline in drug development. Antidepressants currently work for about 30% of patients who take them, with the other 70% experiencing extremely variable efficacy rates. With this novel focus on histamine, perhaps we can reinvigorate the drug discovery efforts, and get that efficacy rate up.

What have you learned from Pittcon 2018? And what have you most enjoyed?

Pittcon is the forum for the most cutting edge analytical research, and what I love is the focus on real world, real life problems. You can attend sessions on environmental chemistry, food chemistry, and biological chemistry and more, so for students and for myself, it’s always nice to see a real application behind this cutting-edge technology. This year’s been a great example of that; there’ve been so many interesting talks about the development of chemical systems and applying it to a problem that would affect ordinary people in their every day lives.

About Professor Parastoo Hashemi

Parastoo (Parry) Hashemi is an Assistant Professor of Chemistry in Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry in the University of South Carolina.

She obtained her PhD in the Department of Bioengineering in Imperial College, London under the mentorship of Martyn Boutelle. She then performed her Post Doctoral studies at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, with Mark Wightman.

Parry started her independent research career in 2011, pioneering a unique interdisciplinary program. Her group develop tools to study pertinent public health issues at the nexus of biology and the environment.

Parry’s work has been recognized with a number of accolades including the Horiba Award in Analytical Chemistry, The Eli Lilly Young Investigator Award in Analytical Chemistry, an NSF CAREER award, The Pittsburgh Conference Award, The Royce Murray Award for Analytical Chemistry and the University of South Carolina’s Breakthrough Stars Award.

Tagged with:

About author

Related Articles