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December 19, 2018 - Energy costs, social isolation contribute to health risk of older adults in extreme weather
December 19, 2018 - Potential combination therapy against rare disease of the bone marrow could improve treatment
December 19, 2018 - UC San Diego Health offers new DRG stimulation device for phantom limb pain
December 19, 2018 - Study examines relationship between growth restriction and risk of childhood mortality
December 19, 2018 - New study provides insights on increased risk of suicide in young patients visiting ED
December 19, 2018 - AHA: Thyroid Problems Linked to Worsening Heart Failure
December 19, 2018 - World-first coeliac disease vaccine enters Phase 2 trials
December 19, 2018 - RNA sequencing offers novel insights into the microbiome
December 19, 2018 - A promising, effective vaccine for common respiratory disease
December 19, 2018 - Protein may slow progression of emphysema, study finds
December 19, 2018 - Studying atrial fibrillation — and exploring new frontiers in precision health
December 19, 2018 - A New Way To Get College Students Through A Psychiatric Crisis — And Back To School
December 19, 2018 - Optum, UnitedHealthcare take action to help people affected by North Carolina winter storms
December 18, 2018 - Weight change in middle-aged, elderly Chinese Singaporeans related to increased risk of death
December 18, 2018 - Immune cells sacrifice themselves to protect us from invading bacteria
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December 18, 2018 - 2018 in Review
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December 18, 2018 - CRISPR may restore effectiveness of chemotherapies used to treat lung cancer
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December 18, 2018 - Persistent Discrimination ID’d Among Physician Mothers
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December 18, 2018 - The Rise of Anxiety Baking
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December 18, 2018 - Food labels have caused changes in consumers’ intake and industry’s use of key additives
December 18, 2018 - Sickest children could benefit from split liver transplants
December 18, 2018 - Scientists create patient-specific model to identify most effective treatment for appendix cancer
December 18, 2018 - ‘Little Foot’ endocast reveals a small brain combining ape-like and human-like features
December 18, 2018 - New therapy for childhood blindness shows ‘very promising’ results
December 18, 2018 - Researchers discover promising new compound against Buruli ulcer
December 18, 2018 - Study finds significant use of traditional, complementary and alternative medicines in Sub-Saharan Africa
December 18, 2018 - California Farm Implicated in Outbreak of E. coli Tied to Romaine Lettuce
December 18, 2018 - Mobile health has power to transform HIV/AIDS nursing
December 18, 2018 - Celiac Vaccine in Clinical Trials at Columbia
December 18, 2018 - Research into mental health first aid prompts practical guidance and resources for workplace
December 18, 2018 - Researcher conducts study to investigate peripheral blood markers of Alzheimer’s disease
December 18, 2018 - Researchers identify link between mucus in the small airways and pulmonary fibrosis
December 18, 2018 - EU Commission’s Health Policy Platform to host EKHA program on transplantation
December 18, 2018 - Survivors of childhood Hodgkin lymphoma have high risk of developing solid tumors
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December 18, 2018 - From Machines to Cyclic Compounds
December 18, 2018 - New study reveals best assessment tools to establish delirium severity
December 18, 2018 - Rice University scientists develop synthetic protein switches to control electron flow
December 18, 2018 - Home-based pulmonary function monitoring for teens with Duchenne muscular dystrophy
December 18, 2018 - Researchers identify potential target for new breast cancer treatments
December 18, 2018 - National Biofilms Innovation Centre award grant to Neem Biotech for novel anti-biofilm drug development
December 18, 2018 - Artificial intelligence and the future of medicine
December 18, 2018 - Montana State doctoral student receives grant for her work to improve neuroscience tool
December 18, 2018 - Early postpartum initiation of opioids associated with persistent use
December 18, 2018 - Russian scientists identify molecular ‘switch’ that could be target for treatment of allergic asthma
December 18, 2018 - Surgeons make more mistakes in the operating room during stressful moments, shows study
December 18, 2018 - Immune cells explode themselves to inform about the danger of invading bacteria
December 18, 2018 - Malnutrition in children with Crohn’s disease linked with increased risk of surgical complications
December 18, 2018 - FDA Approves Motegrity (prucalopride) for Adults with Chronic Idiopathic Constipation (CIC)
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December 18, 2018 - Study finds new strains of hepatitis C virus in sub-Saharan Africa
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December 18, 2018 - Novel Breast Imaging Technique Might Cut Unnecessary Biopsies
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December 18, 2018 - Study finds epigenetic differences in the brains of individuals with schizophrenia
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September 2018 Briefing – HIV & AIDS

September 2018 Briefing – HIV & AIDS

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in HIV & AIDS for September 2018. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Physicians Often Don’t Address Their Burnout

FRIDAY, Sept. 28, 2018 — More than half of physicians experience burnout, and many do not seek treatment for burnout, according to a report published in the American Medical Association’s AMA Wire.

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Business Degree Increasingly Useful for Doctors

THURSDAY, Sept. 27, 2018 — Having a Master of Business Administration degree (M.B.A.) can help doctors with important, practice-related decisions, according to a report published recently in Physician Practice.

Abstract/Full Text

Practices Should Set Rules for Staff Social Media Use

THURSDAY, Sept. 27, 2018 — Medical practices can take steps to avoid problems related to use of social media by staff members, according to an article published in Medical Economics.

Abstract/Full Text

Burnout, Career Choice Regret Prevalent in U.S. Residents

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 26, 2018 — Symptoms of burnout and career choice regret are prevalent among U.S. resident physicians, according to a study published in the Sept. 18 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

HIV Infection Diagnoses on the Rise in Young Homosexual Men

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 26, 2018 — Among men who have sex with men (MSM), the change in the annual number of HIV diagnoses from 2008 to 2016 varies with age, according to research published in the Sept. 21 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

Abstract/Full Text

In 2016, Proportion of Uninsured Americans Down to 10 Percent

TUESDAY, Sept. 25, 2018 — From 2013 to 2016 there was a reduction in uninsurance among Americans from 17 to 10 percent, according to a report published in September by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and the Urban Institute.

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Physician-Group ACOs Generate Medicare Savings

TUESDAY, Sept. 25, 2018 — Physician-group accountable care organizations (ACOs) participating in the Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP) generated significantly more savings for Medicare that grew from 2012 to 2015 compared with hospital-integrated ACOs, according to research published in the Sept. 20 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text

Some Clinicians, Patients Record Clinic Visits for Patient Use

FRIDAY, Sept. 21, 2018 — A considerable proportion of clinicians and patients report having recorded a clinic visit for the patient’s personal use, according to a study published in the September issue of the Journal of Medical Internet Research.

Abstract/Full Text

Dozens of Medical Groups Join Forces to Improve Diagnoses

FRIDAY, Sept. 21, 2018 — Every nine minutes, a patient in a U.S. hospital dies because a diagnosis was wrong or delayed — resulting in 80,000 deaths a year. That sobering estimate comes from the Society to Improve Diagnosis in Medicine (SIDM).

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Research Links Doctor Burnout to Patient Safety Incidents

THURSDAY, Sept. 20, 2018 — Physician burnout is associated with increased risk of patient safety incidents, poorer quality of care due to low professionalism, and reduced patient satisfaction, according to a review published online Sept. 4 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Hospitals Charge 479 Percent of Cost of Drugs on Average

THURSDAY, Sept. 20, 2018 — On average, hospitals mark up drugs by 479 percent of their cost, according to a report from The Moran Company, commissioned by the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA).

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Residents Should Take Advantage of Paid Time Off

THURSDAY, Sept. 20, 2018 — Although there are many demands on residents, taking advantage of paid vacation time is one of the perks and should be maximized, according to an article published in the American Medical Association’s AMA Wire.

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Patient Health Information Often Shared Electronically

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 19, 2018 — The most common electronically sent and received types of patient health information (PHI) include laboratory results and medication lists, according to a report published Aug. 15 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics.

Abstract/Full Text

Global Prevalence of Insufficient Activity 27.5 Percent

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 19, 2018 — In 2016 the age-standardized prevalence of insufficient physical activity was 27.5 percent, according to a study published in the October issue of The Lancet Global Health.

Abstract/Full Text
Editorial

Scribes Improve Physician Workflow, Patient Interaction

TUESDAY, Sept. 18, 2018 — Use of medical scribes is associated with decreased physician documentation burden, improved work efficiency, and improved patient interactions, according to a study published online Sept. 17 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text
Editorial

Drug Prices Increase More Than Expected After Shortages

TUESDAY, Sept. 18, 2018 — Prices for drugs under shortage increase more than twice as quickly as expected in the absence of a shortage, according to a research letter published online Sept. 18 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Compliance With Requirement to Report Results on EUCTR Is Poor

TUESDAY, Sept. 18, 2018 — Half of trials on the European Union Clinical Trials Register (EUCTR) are non-compliant with the European Commission’s requirement that all trials post results to the registry within 12 month of completion, according to a study published online Sept. 13 in The BMJ.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Association Health Plans Can Help Small Businesses Offer Coverage

MONDAY, Sept. 17, 2018 — Association health plans (AHPs) will provide small businesses with more choices, access, and coverage options, although critics warn that they may undermine the Affordable Care Act (ACA) marketplace, according to an article published in Managed Healthcare Executive.

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Patrons of ‘Vampire Facial’ Spa May Have Been Exposed to HIV

FRIDAY, Sept. 14, 2018 — Customers of an Albuquerque spa who received a “vampire facial” are being warned that they may have been exposed to HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C through human blood used in the controversial procedure.

CBS News Article

Situation Framing, Language Can Influence Decision-Making

FRIDAY, Sept. 14, 2018 — How a situation is framed and the language used to describe risks can influence patients’ decision-making, according to an article published in Physicians Practice.

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Gains in Insurance Coverage Seen for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual Adults

THURSDAY, Sept. 13, 2018 — Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) adults report continued problems affording care despite coverage gains offered by the Affordable Care Act, according to a study published in the August issue of Health Affairs.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Six-Step Analysis Can Help Improve Practice Logistics

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 12, 2018 — A six-step analysis can help redesign and improve the outpatient health care process, according to a study recently published in the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.

Abstract/Full Text

Residents Working Long Hours Can Increase Alertness

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 12, 2018 — Medical residents can take steps to maintain their energy and alertness during long shifts, according to an article published in the American Medical Association’s AMA Wire.

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Medicaid Work Requirements Don’t Impact Many Enrollees

TUESDAY, Sept. 11, 2018 — Medicaid work requirements will only impact a small proportion of persons and may only generate minimal savings, according to two research letters published online Sept. 10 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text – Goldman
Abstract/Full Text – Silvestri
Editorial

Data Age in Clinical Trials Is About Three Years at Publication

TUESDAY, Sept. 11, 2018 — The median data age in clinical trials in journals with a high impact factor is about three years at publication, according to a study published in the Aug. 10 issue of JAMA Network Open.

Abstract/Full Text

Many Opportunities for Doctors Using Twitter

MONDAY, Sept. 10, 2018 — Doctors can use Twitter to build networks and learn more about research in real time, according to a blog post published by Penn Medicine News.

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Docs, Consumers Agree on Benefits of Virtual Care

MONDAY, Sept. 10, 2018 — Physicians and consumers agree on the benefits of virtual care, but physician adoption of virtual care technologies is low, according to a report on the Deloitte 2018 Survey of U.S. Physicians.

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Physician Burnout Rates Vary by Medical Specialty

MONDAY, Sept. 10, 2018 — Nearly half of physicians report being burned out, but rates vary substantially by medical specialty, according to an article published in AMA Wire.

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Personalized Weighting Could Enhance Hospital Rating Tools

FRIDAY, Sept. 7, 2018 — The weighting systems that underlie hospital performance rating tools should incorporate the needs, values, and preferences of patients, according to a perspective article published in the Aug. 30 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text

Better Training Needed to Boost LGBTQ Patient Health Care

THURSDAY, Sept. 6, 2018 — High-quality health care needs to be provided to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) patients, and improved training is necessary to deliver that care, according to a report published in the American Medical Association’s AMA Wire.

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Hospital Groups Launch Own Generic Drug Company

THURSDAY, Sept. 6, 2018 — Three U.S. health care foundations and seven hospital groups have formed a generic drug company to combat high prices and chronic shortages of medicines.

AP News Article

Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program Has Uncertain Future

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 5, 2018 — Uncertainty surrounds the future of the Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) program, according to an Ideas and Opinions article published online Aug. 28 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Enrollment in High-Deductible Health Plans Up From ’07 to ’17

TUESDAY, Sept. 4, 2018 — Enrollment in high-deductible health plans (HDHPs) has increased among adults with employment-based insurance coverage, according to an August data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics.

Abstract/Full Text

CDC: Increase in Rate of STDs for Fourth Consecutive Year in U.S.

TUESDAY, Sept. 4, 2018 — Nearly 2.3 million cases of chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis were diagnosed in the United States in 2017, marking a fourth consecutive year of sharp increases in these sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), according to a report published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

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Posted: October 2018

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