Breaking News
November 16, 2018 - Drug used to treat dizziness may slow down growth of triple-negative breast cancer
November 16, 2018 - AHA: Icosapent Ethyl Cuts CV Risk From Elevated Triglycerides
November 16, 2018 - ‘Orphan’ RNAs make cancer deadlier, but potentially easier to diagnose
November 16, 2018 - Air Cube touches down at hospital | News Center
November 16, 2018 - CRISPR-based tool shown to enhance cell-based immunotherapy
November 16, 2018 - Mechanisms that govern HIV latency differ in the gut and blood, finds study
November 16, 2018 - Researchers unravel mystery of NPM1 protein in acute myeloid leukemia
November 16, 2018 - High school students less likely to select milk, fruit for lunch when fruit juice is available
November 16, 2018 - Football coaches with great emotional competence are more successful
November 16, 2018 - Researchers awarded $10 million grant to address root causes of asthma in Puerto Rico
November 16, 2018 - Health Tip: Manage Morning Sickness
November 16, 2018 - Immunotherapy combination and chemotherapy show encouraging results in Phase II acute myeloid leukemia study
November 16, 2018 - ACC Latin America Conference brings experts to discuss latest cardiovascular science
November 16, 2018 - Pooled analysis of Intersect ENT’s steroid releasing implants in patients after frontal sinus surgery to be published
November 16, 2018 - Expectations about pain intensity can become self-fulfilling prophecies
November 16, 2018 - NIH awards $3.4 million to UC researchers to study gastrointestinal lymphatic system
November 16, 2018 - Scientist Dr David Taylor of MR Solutions is a finalist in the BMW i UK Tech Founder Awards
November 16, 2018 - Earlier treatment could help reverse autistic-like behavior in tuberous sclerosis
November 16, 2018 - Vegetables and salad may include bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics
November 16, 2018 - Autism linked to prolonged connection between brain regions
November 16, 2018 - Endocrine Society chooses four Diabetes Caucus leaders as winners of Diabetes Champion Award
November 16, 2018 - Brain and muscle cells found within kidney organoids
November 16, 2018 - Person’s sex hormones may play key role in trauma survival, finds study
November 16, 2018 - PTEN Genetic Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information
November 16, 2018 - Toxic metal pollution linked with development of autism spectrum disorder
November 16, 2018 - Calcified nodules in the retina increase risk for progression to late stages of AMD
November 16, 2018 - ZEISS teams up with arivis AG to offer complete 3D imaging solutions
November 16, 2018 - Georgia State professor receives $1.2 million grant to study how the brain controls eating behavior
November 16, 2018 - Specific bacterial toxins reduce number of cells suppressing immune response
November 16, 2018 - Review by ID physician improves outcomes for outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy
November 16, 2018 - Conditions that produce signs similar to arthritis
November 16, 2018 - New artificial intelligence-based method predicts treatment effectiveness
November 16, 2018 - AHA: Dapagliflozin Noninferior to Placebo for MACE in T2DM
November 16, 2018 - Surgery remains best treatment for appendicitis, Stanford study finds
November 16, 2018 - Non-surgical fistula creation system Ellipsys becomes key focus of attention at CiDA
November 16, 2018 - Researchers find no link between ‘allergy friendly’ dogs and lower risk of asthma
November 16, 2018 - Researchers elucidate new rules of connectivity of neurons in the neocortex
November 16, 2018 - Treating children with ‘bubble baby disease’
November 16, 2018 - Nexus announces availability of Arsenic Trioxide Injection in the US
November 16, 2018 - Researchers find metabolite shuttle between cells in the liver that may combat tissue fibrosis
November 16, 2018 - AHA: PTSD Common Among Those Who Suffer Tear in the Aorta’s Wall
November 16, 2018 - Many RA patients’ pain related to central nervous system
November 16, 2018 - Changes in Himalayan gut microbiomes linked to diet
November 16, 2018 - Inhibition of prostaglandin E2 enhances ability to combat infectious colitis
November 16, 2018 - Chronic dry eye can slow reading rate and disrupt day to day tasks
November 16, 2018 - Researchers develop new drug molecule that inhibits inflammation
November 16, 2018 - Dementia symptoms peak in winter and spring, study finds
November 16, 2018 - Stanford tobacco researcher weighs in on JUUL
November 16, 2018 - Increasing omega-3 fatty acid intake during pregnancy reduces risk of premature birth, review finds
November 16, 2018 - Researchers find no link between infants waking up at night and later developmental problems
November 16, 2018 - Both parents and children agree about confidential medical services
November 16, 2018 - FDA warns against use of unapproved pain medications with implanted pumps
November 16, 2018 - Precision medicine-based approach to slow or reverse biologic drivers of Alzheimer’s disease
November 16, 2018 - Study provides new insight into norovirus outbreaks, may help guide efforts to develop vaccines
November 16, 2018 - Inexpensive, portable air purifier could help protect the heart from pollution
November 16, 2018 - New 15-minute scan could help diagnose brain damage in babies up to two years old
November 16, 2018 - Deep brain stimulation not effective for treating early Alzheimer’s
November 16, 2018 - Traditional chemotherapy superior to new alternative for oropharyngeal cancers | News Center
November 16, 2018 - What This Pond Protist Does With Its Genome Will Astound You
November 15, 2018 - Researchers develop tool that speeds up analysis and publication of biomedical data
November 15, 2018 - Scientists identify mechanism used by lung cancer cells to obtain glucose
November 15, 2018 - Abnormalities in development of the brain could be involved in onset of autism, finds new study
November 15, 2018 - Soy protein equally effective as animal protein in building muscle strength
November 15, 2018 - American Academy of Pediatrics, Nov. 2-6
November 15, 2018 - Dopamine drives early addiction to heroin
November 15, 2018 - Variance in gut microbiome in Himalayan populations linked to dietary lifestyle | News Center
November 15, 2018 - Reducing Cardiovascular Disease: The Amish Way
November 15, 2018 - King’s researchers launch charter to guide organizations to engage abuse survivors in research
November 15, 2018 - Enable Injections enters into development agreements with UCB and Apellis Pharmaceuticals
November 15, 2018 - TGen North collaborates with NARBHA Institute to advance human health
November 15, 2018 - Researchers discover molecular basis for therapeutic actions of an African folk medicine
November 15, 2018 - Human Cell Atlas study of early pregnancy shows how mother’s immune system is modified
November 15, 2018 - New guidelines for detecting and managing sarcopenia to be launched in the UK
November 15, 2018 - Researchers explore role of dietary composition on energy expenditure
November 15, 2018 - Elsevier launches Entellect™ Platform, unlocking value by creating AI-ready life sciences data
November 15, 2018 - Now that cannabis is legal in Canada, let’s use it to tackle the opioid crisis
November 15, 2018 - In the Spotlight: At the intersection of tech, health, and ethics
November 15, 2018 - Traditional Glaucoma Test Can Miss Severity of the Disease
November 15, 2018 - Researchers directly connect activities of genes with instinctive behavior in male cichlids
November 15, 2018 - Salk researchers report new methods to identify AD drug candidates with anti-aging properties
$11 million NIH grant for Clemson University helps launch new center for musculoskeletal research

$11 million NIH grant for Clemson University helps launch new center for musculoskeletal research

image_pdfDownload PDFimage_print

With an $11 million grant from the National Institutes of Health Center for Biomedical Research Excellence, Clemson University has launched the South Carolina Center for Translational Research Improving Musculoskeletal Health, or SC-TRIMH, a new research center that will bring together scientists from across South Carolina to change the way musculoskeletal disorders are diagnosed, treated and even studied.

The award was announced Thursday at a meeting of the Clemson University board of trustees. SC-TRIMH is Clemson’s third COBRE-funded center; since 2009, Clemson has received more than $40 million in COBRE funding.

Led by bioengineers at Clemson, SC-TRIMH combines orthopedics and other clinical expertise from the Greenville Health System and the Medical University of South Carolina with computer scientists, computational engineers, biophysicists and other experts to better understand musculoskeletal disorders and to design and evaluate new devices, interventions and drug therapies.

Disorders affecting bones and joints – including arthritis, osteoporosis, chronic back pain and sports injuries – are the leading cause of disability and a major driver of health care costs around the world, especially as the population ages and particularly among poor people. A recent national report showed that one in two American adults have a musculoskeletal problem, with a price tag of nearly $1 trillion in 2014. By 2040, more than one-quarter of Americans – 78 million – will receive a diagnosis of arthritis, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“Thanks to the talent and determination of Clemson faculty, students and staff, and to our invaluable partnerships with GHS and MUSC, South Carolina is leading this exciting new fight against one of the most significant problems facing Americans and American health care,” said Clemson University President James P. Clements. “We are grateful that the NIH has once again acknowledged Clemson University as a leader in academic research, and we look forward to working with our partners to advance innovation and clinical care.”

“By working together, we can significantly improve health care and health outcomes in South Carolina and the nation,” said Spence Taylor, president of Greenville Health System and himself a vascular surgeon. “These innovative partnerships between Clemson faculty and GHS clinicians allow us to solve clinical challenges by leveraging medical insights with the extraordinary research depth of Clemson. What we do today can pave the way for transformational improvements to health care for generations to come.”

“Our team looks forward to deepening our long-standing relationship with Clemson and searching for next-level innovations through this COBRE grant,” said MUSC President David J. Cole. “The challenges we face today in the health care domain are bigger than any one entity can solve. It is only through strategic partnerships based on shared vision and collective effort that we can leverage the strengths and capabilities of our individual institutions to successfully move into the future.”

Revolutionizing testing

A major component of SC-TRIMH is the creation of “virtual clinical trials” to reduce the time it takes novel ideas to go from concept to clinical practice, thereby reducing costs while improving care.

Currently, only about 10 percent of new discoveries find their way into practice within 20 years, due in part to a gap in the clinical trial process, in which innovations go through extensive animal testing before they’re attempted in humans.

“While the current clinical trial process tells us that a product is unsafe or ineffective, they rarely tell us why or suggest how to improve it,” said Hai Yao, Ernest R. Norville Endowed Chair and professor of bioengineering at Clemson University and the administrative leader of the center. “This results in an all-or-nothing mindset in the biomedical industry, which stifles innovation and reduces the number of truly original biomedical projects available to surgeons while increasing costs.”

The virtual clinical trial will fill that gap. It’s akin to very detailed, very personalized flight simulator training for musculoskeletal diseases. Scientists working in SC-TRIMH will build computer simulation models based on patient data, from the cellular pathology of a disease to how the person’s bones and joints move under various scenarios. If the patient needs a hip replacement, surgeons can test various implants in the computer model under different conditions before it’s implanted in the patient.

By constructing very specific models of each step at the body, tissue and molecular scales, the scientists will build a catalog of predictive models that can be used in research, thereby creating a continuous loop of data that will improve innovation.

With Clemson’s rich history in bioengineering and orthopaedic engineering research – establishing one of the first academic departments in the country, playing a major role in creating the Society of Biomaterials and its faculty and students inventing many biomedical advances and devices – SC-TRIMH will also dedicate resources to finding commercial opportunities to make sure innovations are widely available, said Martine LaBerge, professor and chair of the bioengineering department, which recently was ranked fourth in the country for value.

Key partnerships and resources

Several factors position SC-TRIMH to revolutionize clinical trials; chief among them are long-standing collaborations between Clemson and its major health systems partners. Finding, facilitating and nurturing partnerships is the role of the Clemson University School of Health Research (CUSHR), led by Windsor Sherrill, associate vice president for health research and the chief science officer at GHS. CUSHR places the university’s basic scientists and engineers with physicians and other biomedical scientists.

In 2011, Clemson and GHS partnered to open a laboratory, surgical training and innovation space called the Clemson University Bioengineering Innovation Center at the hospital system’s Patewood campus in Greenville, South Carolina, in the same building with clinical orthopedics, vascular surgery and imaging. In 2003, the Clemson-MUSC Bioengineering Program opened at the MUSC campus in Charleston, with Yao (the associate chair for the program) and other faculty stationed there full time.

Other key resources are:

– Supercomputing cyberinfrastructure, namely the Palmetto Cluster, which places Clemson fourth among all public universities in the United States in supercomputing capacity;

– Predictive computational modeling, building on the experience of the Institute for Biological Interfaces of Engineering at Clemson;

– Advanced design, 3-D modeling and rapid prototyping of patient-specific devices in the labs of Georges Fadel in the Clemson Engineering Design Application and Research Center;

– Miniaturized smart sensors for biomedical applications that will enable the testing of prototypes, led by Hai Xiao;

– Expertise in animal models, led by Jeryl Jones; and a human cadaver lab, led by GHS orthopedic surgeon Michael Kissenberth, in the CUBEInC facility.

Three core facilities will be created based on these resources: multiscale computational modeling, led by Hai; advanced fabrication and testing, led by Xiao and Fadel; and, at GHS, pre-clinical assessment, led by Jones and Kissenberth.

Investing in the future

The COBRE grant also funds a pipeline of basic scientists to tackle fundamental questions about musculoskeletal disorders. Five Clemson junior researchers were chosen for positions to be supported by the grant for a maximum of three years, by which time they are expected to apply for and receive their own senior-level funding from the NIH. When a junior researcher “graduates,” a new one is chosen in their place.

As a result, Clemson will produce a cascade of new knowledge and untold educational opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students, and new lab technician positions, LaBerge said.

“The SC-TRIMH initiative has potential to enable truly transformative research by connecting Clemson researchers to our GHS orthopedic researchers,” said Michael Kissenberth, an orthopedic surgeon at GHS who, along with Kyle Jeray, chair of GHS’ orthopaedics department, will lead the clinical advisory committee for the program. “Clinical perspective will inform the work of each junior investigator. So often, this is a missing element in health research. With SC-TRIMH and the Clemson University School of Health Research, we are establishing a new approach to investigating musculoskeletal health. This is a wonderful chapter in orthopedic research at GHS and for South Carolina.”

Each of the original cadre of junior researchers has either already received independent funding or is very close.

The original researchers are:

– Hugo Sanabria, a biophysicist, who is using multiscale modeling to uncover the structure, dynamics, and functional relationship of osteoclast-specific V-ATPases in order to design better therapeutic approaches for osteoporosis.

– William Richardson, who is investigating unknown mechano-sensitivities of the collagen-MMP-growth factor network, and he is developing a computational model for screening potential therapeutic interventions for tendons under diverse loads.

– Tong Ye, who is using two-photon excitation fluorescence and second harmonic generation to evaluate cell and matrix changes of cartilage during tissue remodeling to develop needle endoscopy probes with an imaging system to assess cartilage repair in vivo.

– Melinda Harman, who is developing a novel way to determine the tension profiles of soft tissues crossing the knee joint to improve knee replacement design and to define a predictive pre-clinical test protocol for prospective total knee replacement designs.

– Fei Peng, who is developing embedded, micro-wireless strain sensors for hip joint replacement to understand the effect of surgery factors, such as the positioning and choice of implants, on total hip arthroplasty.

In 2009, a $9 million NIH COBRE program grant funded the South Carolina Center for Bioengineering Center for Regeneration and Formation of Tissues (SC BioCRAFT). In 2014, SC BioCRAFT received a renewal award of an additional $11 million. The center has produced more than 300 scientific publications, filed 45 patents, and has received more than $20 million in external funding.

In 2016, a $10.5 million COBRE grant funded the Eukaryotic Pathogens Innovation Center (EPIC). Since the award, EPIC investigators have generated more than $4.5 million in external funding and produced 35 publications. In addition, EPIC secured the first ever NIH training grant at Clemson.

Source:

http://newsstand.clemson.edu/mediarelations/11-million-nih-grant-creates-new-center-for-musculoskeletal-research/

Tagged with:

About author

Related Articles