Breaking News
March 25, 2019 - Exposure to particulate air pollution may lead to reduced sperm production
March 25, 2019 - Synthetic peptide appears to disrupt inflammation and protect kidneys from nephritis
March 25, 2019 - New guideline focuses on strategies to improve health of older adults with diabetes
March 25, 2019 - Study evaluates prescribing of preventive drugs at the end of life in older adults with cancer
March 25, 2019 - Radial or femoral approaches for PCI are equal in terms of survival in heart attack patients
March 25, 2019 - Study shows how some autoimmune diseases are more closely related than others
March 25, 2019 - Long term opioid medications impacts production of important hormones
March 25, 2019 - FDA Issues Complete Response Letter for Zynquista (sotagliflozin)
March 25, 2019 - CDC researchers report on trends in hospital breastfeeding policies
March 25, 2019 - States Push For Caregiver Tax Credits
March 25, 2019 - Females on ketogenic diet fail to show metabolic benefits in animal model
March 25, 2019 - Modulating stiffness of blood-forming stem cells could facilitate mobilization procedures
March 25, 2019 - Gene editing regulations to be tightened
March 25, 2019 - CPAP treatment can result in weight loss in people with sleep apnea and obseity
March 25, 2019 - Breast Density Categorization Varies With Screening Modality
March 25, 2019 - Researchers explore link between metal exposure and Parkinson’s symptoms
March 25, 2019 - Later meal timing may contribute to weight gain
March 25, 2019 - Around one in hundred people has autism spectrum condition in China
March 25, 2019 - Research paves way for new standard of care to improve heart’s pump function
March 25, 2019 - Exposure to HIV virus, antiretroviral therapy before birth linked to obesity and asthma-like symptoms
March 25, 2019 - Transgender men preserve their fertility potential after one year of testosterone therapy
March 25, 2019 - Tighter Blood Pressure Control May Prevent Brain Lesions
March 25, 2019 - A reward now or later? Exploring impulsivity in Parkinson’s disease patients
March 25, 2019 - Financial incentives fail to increase completion rates of colorectal cancer screening tests mailed to patients
March 25, 2019 - New research program launched to highlight sexual harassment in academia
March 25, 2019 - Hemoglobin A1c blood test does not detect diabetes in most patients, shows study
March 25, 2019 - Wyss Technology licensed by Sherlock Biosciences to create affordable molecular diagnostics
March 25, 2019 - DWK Life Sciences launches KIMBLE GLS 80 Media Bottle and Multiport Cap System
March 25, 2019 - New study aims to reduce online sexual exploitation of children
March 25, 2019 - Want healthier eating habits? Start with a workout
March 25, 2019 - New approach to prescribing antibiotics could curb resistance
March 24, 2019 - Theravance Biopharma Announces First Patient Dosed in Phase 2b/3 Study of TD-1473 in Patients with Ulcerative Colitis
March 24, 2019 - Prenatal DHA prevents blood-pressure increase from obesity during childhood
March 24, 2019 - Combined immunosuppression may be effective, safe in treating older patients with Crohn’s disease
March 24, 2019 - GSK sells health drinks arm, buys US cancer treatment firm
March 24, 2019 - Bacteria and innate immune factors in birth canal, cervix may be key to predicting preterm births
March 24, 2019 - IgG antibodies play unexpected role in atherosclerosis
March 24, 2019 - Sounds and vibrations are quite similar for the brain, finds new study
March 24, 2019 - Practices for Reducing COPD Hospital Readmissions Explored
March 24, 2019 - Could an eye doctor diagnose Alzheimer’s before you have symptoms?
March 24, 2019 - Enzyme inhibitor stops inflammation and neurodevelopmental disorders in mouse models
March 24, 2019 - Walk, Dance, Clean: Even a Little Activity Helps You Live Longer
March 24, 2019 - Americans used less eye care in 2014 versus 2008
March 24, 2019 - Study finds link between depression in 20s linked to memory loss in 50s
March 24, 2019 - New tool helps physiotherapy students to master complex fine motor skills
March 24, 2019 - The AMR Centre secures £2.3m funding boost
March 24, 2019 - Study examines effects of taking ondansetron during first trimester of pregnancy
March 24, 2019 - Researchers identify a more effective treatment for cancer
March 24, 2019 - Open-source solution for multiparametric optical mapping of the heart’s electrical activity
March 24, 2019 - New nanotechnology approach shows promise in treating triple negative breast cancer
March 24, 2019 - Trevena Announces Publication of APOLLO-1 Results in The Journal of Pain Research Highlighting Oliceridine’s Potential for Management of Moderate-to-Severe Acute Pain
March 24, 2019 - Maternal deaths following C-section 50 times higher in Africa compared to high-income countries
March 24, 2019 - Apple watch could detect irregular heart beat says study
March 24, 2019 - Queen Mary University of London’s BCI boosts radionuclide imaging capabilities with MILabs VECTor technology
March 24, 2019 - Girls should be encouraged to gain more ball skills, shows study
March 24, 2019 - Acute doses of synthetic cannabinoid can impair critical thinking and memory
March 24, 2019 - Presence of bacteria in urine does not always point to infection, shows study
March 24, 2019 - Scientists identify a new role for nerve-supporting cells
March 24, 2019 - Hidden differences between pathology of CTE and Alzheimer’s disease discovered
March 24, 2019 - Knowing causative genes of osteoporosis may open door to more effective treatments
March 24, 2019 - Toilet-seat based cardiovascular monitoring system getting ready to begin commercialization
March 24, 2019 - New model for intensive care identifies factors that send ill patients to ICU
March 24, 2019 - Recommendations Issued for HSCT in Multiple Myeloma
March 24, 2019 - Deep brain stimulation provides sustained relief for severe depression
March 24, 2019 - “Statistical significance” may soon be a thing of past?
March 24, 2019 - Researchers track effects of epigenetic marks carried by sperm chromosomes
March 24, 2019 - AHA News: Family Adopts Three Children With Three Different Heart Conditions
March 24, 2019 - Research into opioid painkillers could provide clues for safer drug development
March 23, 2019 - Lung cancer survivor recounts her lifetime struggles
March 23, 2019 - Radial and femoral approach for PCI achieve similar results in terms of survival
March 23, 2019 - Study sheds light on the optimal timing of coronary angiography in NSTEMI patients
March 23, 2019 - Excess hormones could cause a condition that can lead to blindness in women, study finds
March 23, 2019 - Dramatic shifts in first-time opioid prescriptions bring hope, concern
March 23, 2019 - Antidepressant drugs may not work when neurons are out of shape
March 23, 2019 - TTUHSC El Paso to establish endowed chair in neurology through a major grant
March 23, 2019 - New device approved by FDA for treating patients with moderate-to-severe heart failure
March 23, 2019 - People with peripheral artery disease have lower Omega-3 Index, shows research
March 23, 2019 - Trigger warnings have minimal impact on how people respond to content, shows research
March 23, 2019 - Gilead Announces Data From Two Studies Supporting Further Development of GS-6207, a Novel, Investigational HIV-1 Capsid Inhibitor as a Component of Future Long-Acting HIV Therapies
March 23, 2019 - Selfish genetic elements amplify inflammation and age-related diseases
NTU Singapore uses 3D-printed anatomical specimens for medical education

NTU Singapore uses 3D-printed anatomical specimens for medical education

image_pdfDownload PDFimage_print

Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) is pioneering the use of 3D-printed anatomical specimens for medical education in Singapore.

Just last month, students at the Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine (LKCMedicine), jointly set up by NTU Singapore and Imperial College London, started learning anatomy with 3D-printed specimens.

A collaboration between LKCMedicine and NTU’s Singapore Centre for 3D Printing, these 3D-printed specimens come in varying materials, colors, hardness and flexibility to mimic the properties of anatomical structures in a real human body – a first in Singapore.

The made-in-NTU 3D-printed specimens are the latest example of NTU turning to innovative learning tools to prepare its medical students, as the medical education landscape shifts in tandem with the influx of digital technologies.

LKCMedicine is also looking into other pedagogical approaches such as a medical tutor powered by artificial intelligence and a mobile app where virtual 3D animated specimens can be accessed. (See Annex A)

Such innovative teaching tools are highlighted at the Transform Medical Education (Transform MedEd), an inaugural two-day conference that looks at how new pedagogical approaches and the latest technologies are shaping the future of medical education and healthcare practice.

Jointly organized by LKCMedicine and Imperial College London School of Medicine, the conference provides a platform for local and international thought leaders to interact with educators, scientists and students. The interactive program will focus on the latest advances in the science and practice of medical education, and participants will share perspectives on how innovations in technology and pedagogy can transform the way health professionals learn.

NTU President Professor Subra Suresh said, “As the boundaries between the physical, digital, and biological words become increasingly blurred, we should examine as to how we can use technology to break down the walls between classrooms and clinical learning environments. With digital technologies such as artificial intelligence, data science, 3D printing, and augmented reality playing an increasingly significant role in medical care, we want to make sure that we continuously improve teaching and learning methods and their outcomes for students at NTU.

“This means leveraging resources on the NTU Smart Campus and our strengths in areas of computing and computer science to integrate the latest technologies into our pedagogical approach, so that we can help train our medical students to become well-prepared, confident and capable doctors.”

Professor Simone Buitendijk, Vice-Provost (Education) at Imperial College London, said: “This international conference reflects Singapore’s status as a global hub for medical education.

“From artificial intelligence to curriculum-mapping software, collaboration between Imperial College London and NTU is changing the way future doctors learn. We embrace the challenge of keeping pace with shifting global health priorities – from caring for aging populations to meeting the rising demand for personalized medicine.

“As demonstrated at this conference, educators and industry stand ready with an abundance of ideas that will improve patient outcomes for the better.”

Over the two days, there will be practical opportunities for participants to enhance their teaching skills and learn about the latest advances in medical education with hands-on workshops, facilitated discussions and presentations by internationally renowned medical educators.

Invited speakers include Queen Mary University of London Professor of Medicine and Education Dame Parveen Kumar, who will challenge the conventions of textbook learning in medical education, LKCMedicine Visiting Professor Henk Schmidt who will present a research-informed view of How students learn in the healthcare setting, and IBM Asia Pacific Director of Healthcare & Social Services Ms Farhana Nakhooda, who will talk about augmented clinical intelligence as a new era in healthcare. (See Annex B)

LKCMedicine Dean Professor James Best said, “Our mission is to train a new generation of doctors who know how and when to use the latest technology, while never losing sight of what matters the most – the patient, who is at the heart of their care.

“To prepare our students to become patient-centred doctors, we at LKCMedicine are harnessing the latest technologies from 3D printing to high-fidelity simulation to offer a modern and interactive medical education, while at the same time retaining the patient’s perspective and experience throughout our curriculum, right from the first few weeks of medical school.”

Since it was established in 2010, LKCMedicine has employed innovative technologies and the best teaching practices to deliver a modern medical education.

Moving away from the traditional lectures, LKCMedicine adopts the flipped classroom pedagogy, where students learn the course content online before class and face time with professors and classmates is devoted to collaborative learning. In 2013, the school pioneered the use of plastinated specimens, eliminating the need for traditionally preserved cadavers which are in short supply in Singapore.

The first batch of LKCMedicine students graduated in 2017 and are now working in the various public hospitals in Singapore.

Tagged with:

About author

Related Articles