Breaking News
December 13, 2018 - Zogenix Announces Positive Phase 3 Trial Results on the Efficacy and Safety of Fintepla (ZX008) in Dravet Syndrome
December 13, 2018 - BCR ABL Genetic Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information
December 13, 2018 - Caffeinated beverages during pregnancy linked to lower birth weight babies
December 13, 2018 - Stanford Medicine Health Trends Report examines opportunity to democratize health care
December 13, 2018 - Obsessive-compulsive disorder may protect individuals from obesity
December 13, 2018 - Scientists investigate how a painful event is processed in the brain
December 13, 2018 - Genetic study reveals new insights into underlying causes of moderate-to-severe asthma
December 13, 2018 - Vitamin C supplementation for pregnant smokers may reduce harm to infants’ lungs
December 13, 2018 - New study reveals yin-yang personality of dopamine
December 13, 2018 - Long-term Benefit of Steroid Injections for Knee Osteoarthritis Challenged
December 13, 2018 - Adding new channels to the brain remote control
December 13, 2018 - In the Spotlight: A different side of neuroscience
December 13, 2018 - Medical Marvels: Using immunotherapy for melanoma that spread to the brain
December 13, 2018 - Puzzles do not keep dementia away finds study
December 13, 2018 - New mouse model shows potential for rapid identification of promising muscular dystrophy therapies
December 13, 2018 - Study reveals urban and rural differences in prenatal exposure to essential and toxic elements
December 13, 2018 - New collaborative partnership in quest of novel antibiotics
December 13, 2018 - Single tau molecule holds clues to help diagnose neurodegeneration in its earliest stages
December 13, 2018 - AHA Scientific Statement: Low Risk of Side Effects for Statins
December 13, 2018 - What Is Acute Flaccid Myelitis?
December 13, 2018 - How bereaved people control their thoughts without knowing it
December 13, 2018 - Health care democratization underway, according to 2nd annual Stanford Medicine Health Trends Report | News Center
December 13, 2018 - Going Beyond a Single Color
December 13, 2018 - London-based startup launches ‘thedrug.store’ aiming to clean up CBD industry
December 13, 2018 - Loss of tight junction barrier protein results in gastric cancer development
December 13, 2018 - Novel way to efficiently deliver anti-parasitic medicines
December 13, 2018 - RKI publishes new data on disease prevention and utilization of medical services
December 13, 2018 - High-tech, flexible patches sewn into clothes could help to stay warm
December 13, 2018 - The CCA releases three reports on requests for medical assistance in dying
December 13, 2018 - Restoring Hair Growth on Scarred Skin? Mouse Study Could Show the Way
December 13, 2018 - Probiotic use may reduce antibiotic prescriptions, researchers say
December 13, 2018 - Drug repositioning strategy identifies potential new treatments for epilepsy
December 13, 2018 - Chronic rhinitis associated with hospital readmissions for asthma and COPD patients
December 13, 2018 - Food poisoning discovery could save lives
December 13, 2018 - Cloned antibodies show potential to treat, diagnose life-threatening fungal infections
December 13, 2018 - Exercise may reduce colorectal cancer risk after weight loss
December 13, 2018 - Russian scientists create hardware-information system for brain disorders treatment
December 13, 2018 - Moderate alcohol consumption linked with lower risk of hospitalization
December 13, 2018 - Nurturing Healthy Neighborhoods | NIH News in Health
December 13, 2018 - Rise in meth and opioid use during pregnancy
December 13, 2018 - Researchers gain new insights into pediatric tumors
December 13, 2018 - FSU study finds racial disparity among adolescents receiving flu vaccine
December 13, 2018 - Study investigates attitudes toward implementation of ‘sex as a biological variable’ policy
December 13, 2018 - Drug cocktail induces cancer cell death by switching off energy supply
December 13, 2018 - Baculovirus virion completely eliminates liver-stage parasites in mouse model
December 13, 2018 - Researchers create noninvasive technology that detects when nerve cells fire
December 13, 2018 - Allen Institute for Immunology to partner with CU Anschutz to understand dynamics of human immune system
December 13, 2018 - Inability to do daily living tasks delays discharge of mental health patients
December 13, 2018 - Treating patients with hypertension induced albuminuria
December 13, 2018 - New substance could improve efficacy of established breast cancer treatments
December 13, 2018 - Scientists develop new stem cell line to study conversion of stem cells into muscle
December 13, 2018 - Re-programming the body’s energy pathway boosts kidney self-repair
December 13, 2018 - Research findings could help improve treatment of anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorders
December 13, 2018 - The Microbiome Movement announce Microbiotica as official industry partner
December 13, 2018 - New study reveals potential benefits of cEEG monitoring for infant ICU patients
December 13, 2018 - Whole-body imaging PET/MRI offers information to guide treatment options for prostate cancer
December 13, 2018 - International investigators fight against the negative campaign on benzodiazepines
December 13, 2018 - Targeting biochemical pathway may lead to new therapies for alleviating symptoms of anxiety disorders
December 13, 2018 - FDA Approves Tolsura (SUBA®-itraconazole capsules) for the Treatment of Certain Fungal Infections
December 13, 2018 - Are scientists studying the wrong kind of mice?
December 13, 2018 - Computer memory: A scientific team builds a virtual model of a key brain region
December 13, 2018 - Visual inspection alone is insufficient to diagnose skin cancer
December 13, 2018 - Paternal grandfather’s access to food associated with grandson’s mortality risk
December 13, 2018 - Our brain senses angry voices in a flash, study shows
December 13, 2018 - PM2.5 Exposure Linked to Asthma Rescue Medication Use
December 13, 2018 - Can’t exercise? A hot bath may help improve inflammation, metabolism, study suggests
December 13, 2018 - Can artificial intelligence help doctors with the human side of medicine?
December 13, 2018 - Virginia Tech and UC San Diego researchers team up to develop nonopioid drug for chronic pain
December 13, 2018 - NIH offers support for HIV care and prevention research in the southern United States
December 12, 2018 - Activating brain region could revive the urge to socialize among opioid addicts
December 12, 2018 - Relationship impairment appears to interfere with seeking mental health treatment in men
December 12, 2018 - Sleep, Don’t Cram, Before Finals for Better Grades
December 12, 2018 - Effective treatments for urticarial vasculitis
December 12, 2018 - Gun violence is a public health issue: One physician’s story
December 12, 2018 - The Science of Healthy Aging
December 12, 2018 - Yes to yoghurt and cheese: New improved Mediterranean diet
December 12, 2018 - Researchers uncover a number of previously unknown insecticide resistance mechanisms
December 12, 2018 - Regulating the immune system’s ‘regulator’
December 12, 2018 - In breaking bad news, the comfort of silence
December 12, 2018 - Study finds upward link between alcohol consumption and physical activity in college students
“Placental organoids” could be the future of pregnancy and conception research say researchers

“Placental organoids” could be the future of pregnancy and conception research say researchers

image_pdfDownload PDFimage_print

Researchers have successfully managed to develop “mini placentas” or placenta organoids in the laboratories that could transform research of pregnancy, conception, stillbirth, miscarriages and pregnancy diseases and disorders.

The results of the study developing these organoids have been published in the latest issue of the journal Nature.

These organoids can successfully mimic the placenta in its early stages during the first trimester explain the researchers. This means that the drugs or diseases that affect the placenta during this phase and lead to miscarriages can be studied. In fact these tiny placentas are so like the real placenta that they can also test positive with a pregnancy test the team explains. Ashley Moffett, a senior researcher on the team and professor of reproductive immunology at Cambridge University confirmed this saying, “If we put a pregnancy stick into the medium from the organoids it reads ‘pregnant’.”

The team explains that studying a placenta within the womb has been notoriously difficult till date. The healthy placenta develops and attaches to the walls of the womb and supplies nutrients and oxygenated blood to the growing embryo and fetus. It not only secretes hormones and chemicals that allow the fetus to grow but also excretes the waste generated by the growing fetus. The placenta also secretes hormones into the maternal blood stream that helps carry the pregnancy successfully. These phenomenon could not be studied in humans till now. With the development of the organoids, now the researchers can understand the functions and workings of the placenta in details. Moffett said, “We can now begin to do experiments on how placental development occurs in the uterine environment.”

The team used cells from the villi of the placental tissue. These villi are hair like structures of the normal placenta. These placental cells when grown in the lab can organize into multi-cellular clumps or structures that can act like the real placenta by secreting proteins and hormones. These are of sizes ranging from a tenth of a millimetre to half a millimetre and can be stored in frozen form only to be thawed before use.

Experts in the filed have hailed this research and have said that it would provide invaluable insights into common pregnancy disorders including still births, growth restriction within the uterus (IUGR) and pre-eclampsia. Infections of the fetus such as Zika and how they affect the development and growth could also be studied they add.

Lead author of the research, Margherita Turco, in a statement said, “The placenta is absolutely essential for supporting the baby as it grows inside the mother. When it doesn’t function properly it can result in serious problems, from pre-eclampsia to miscarriage, with immediate and lifelong consequences for both mother and child.” The team adds that this would also be invaluable in testing teratogenic drugs or drugs that could harm the unborn baby if administered to the mother. Placental organoids would also be a source of stem cell therapies in failing or threatened pregnancies the team explains. In short, there are several uses of these organoids in pregnancy research.

According to Moffett, “It has taken 30 years to reach this point and to have mini-placentas which we know will grow in the laboratory for at least a year.”

Source:

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-018-0753-3

Posted in: Medical Research News | Women’s Health News

Tags: Baby, Blood, Cell, Conception, Drugs, Eclampsia, Embryo, Hair, Immunology, Laboratory, Miscarriage, Nutrients, Organoids, Placenta, Pre-eclampsia, Pregnancy, Research, Stem Cell, Stillbirth, Uterus, Villi, Womb

Tagged with:

About author

Related Articles