Breaking News
November 20, 2018 - Towards finding a druggable cancer target
November 20, 2018 - Ultragenyx Announces Intent to Submit New Drug Application to U.S. FDA for UX007 for the Treatment of Long-chain Fatty Acid Oxidation Disorders in Mid-2019
November 20, 2018 - Cooling ‘brains on fire’ to treat Parkinson’s
November 20, 2018 - Less pollution could increase the average lifespan of Copenhageners by an entire year in 2040
November 20, 2018 - Abramson Cancer Center becomes the 28th member institution of National Comprehensive Cancer Network
November 20, 2018 - The plug and play time-resolved spectrometer from PicoQuant
November 20, 2018 - Breakthrough technology offers new hope to people with glaucoma, retinitis and macular degeneration
November 20, 2018 - New report highlights key focus areas to help cancer screening realize its full potential
November 20, 2018 - International experts to discuss strategies to maintain spatial orientation in old age
November 20, 2018 - Scientists discover new inhibitor that decreases lung inflammation
November 20, 2018 - Participation project calls for relaxing research ban on germline interventions
November 20, 2018 - Karyopharm’s Selinexor Receives Fast Track Designation from FDA for the Treatment of Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma
November 20, 2018 - Arthritis by the Numbers: Book of Trusted Facts & Figures
November 20, 2018 - Drug homing method helps rethink Parkinson’s
November 20, 2018 - AHF commends the passage of global AIDS funding in the House, calls for swift approval
November 20, 2018 - The search for new psychiatric disorder treatments
November 20, 2018 - New research offers hope for simpler way to diagnose and treat cancer
November 20, 2018 - Study sheds light on the infection mechanism of influenza virus
November 20, 2018 - Storage failures of eggs and embryos gain a new perspective
November 20, 2018 - Buyers of short-term health plans: Wise or shortsighted?
November 20, 2018 - Study indicates that frogs in virus-exposed groups breed at young age
November 20, 2018 - FDA Alerts Health Care Professionals and Patients Not To Use Sterile Drug Products from Pharm D Solutions
November 20, 2018 - Asthma may contribute to childhood obesity epidemic
November 20, 2018 - Researchers to explore the enigmatic role of unstructured protein in regulating circadian function
November 20, 2018 - Many patients with adenomas do not receive colonoscopy within recommended time frame
November 20, 2018 - Drug used to treat PTSD does not reduce suicidal thinking, may worsen nightmares and insomnia
November 20, 2018 - In-person social contact may offer protection against depression and PTSD symptoms
November 20, 2018 - Routine HCV testing in correctional facilities can best identify and treat disease, say researchers
November 20, 2018 - Molecular DNA analysis could facilitate more accurate prognosis, treatment of aggressive brain tumors
November 20, 2018 - Breast Cancer Recurrence Rate Not Up With Autologous Fat Transfer
November 20, 2018 - Beta 2 Microglobulin (B2M) Tumor Marker Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information
November 20, 2018 - Could bariatric surgery make men more virile?
November 20, 2018 - Urine test to check if patients take their medications will save the NHS money, say researchers
November 20, 2018 - Study reveals impact of residual inflammatory risk on clinical outcomes after PCI
November 20, 2018 - RNAi therapy shown to alleviate preeclampsia
November 20, 2018 - Replacement of dysfunctional microglia has therapeutic potential for neurodegenerative diseases
November 20, 2018 - Forming 3D Neuronal Models of the Brain
November 20, 2018 - Shoulder ultrasounds could be used to predict diabetes
November 20, 2018 - SGLT2 Inhibitors for Diabetes Linked to Increased Risk for Amputation
November 20, 2018 - Stem cell transplant cements Arizona men’s father-son bond
November 20, 2018 - Scientists try to develop portable systems that can quickly produce biologics on demand
November 20, 2018 - Automating Data Capture and Image Analysis in Continuous Experiments
November 20, 2018 - New drug shows promise for treating people with peanut allergy
November 20, 2018 - Researchers develop novel mouse model to study immunomodulatory therapies
November 20, 2018 - “Britain must not go backward on antibiotic controls to appease US trade deals” – Jim Moseley, CEO of Red Tractor
November 20, 2018 - Widespread errors in ‘proofreading’ cause inherited blindness
November 20, 2018 - Reaping the benefits of living longer
November 20, 2018 - New Program Hopes to Make Early Detection and Treatment of ALS a Reality
November 19, 2018 - Artificial bone-like substance mimics the way real bone grows at atomic level
November 19, 2018 - FDA Grants Orphan Drug Designation To RGX-181 Gene Therapy For The Treatment Of CLN2 Form Of Batten Disease
November 19, 2018 - Systemic mastocytosis – Genetics Home Reference
November 19, 2018 - Eye trauma secondary to falls in older adults increasing
November 19, 2018 - Empowering women in India to improve their health: A Q&A
November 19, 2018 - Researchers have trained a computer to analyze breast cancer images and classify tumors
November 19, 2018 - New glucose binding molecule could be key to better metabolic control for diabetics
November 19, 2018 - Biologists uncover novel genetic control of lipid maintenance and its potential connection to lifespan
November 19, 2018 - Warmer winters may set scene for higher rates of violent crimes
November 19, 2018 - Personalized program of physical exercise effective in reversing functional decline in the elderly
November 19, 2018 - Acacia Pharma Resubmits Barhemsys New Drug Application
November 19, 2018 - PDL1 (Immunotherapy) Tests: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information
November 19, 2018 - Transforming pregnancy research with a smartphone app
November 19, 2018 - Stanford Medicine magazine explores how digital technology is changing health care
November 19, 2018 - Vision impairments may increase risk of falls in older adults
November 19, 2018 - Concomitant use of sleeping pills and opioids found to prevalent among people with Alzheimer’s disease
November 19, 2018 - Marijuana prevention programs should focus on promoting mental wellbeing of youth
November 19, 2018 - New report calls for greater awareness and emphasis on scale and impact of atrial fibrillation
November 19, 2018 - In throes of turkey salmonella outbreak, don’t invite illness to your table
November 19, 2018 - UK health policies should be redesigned to become more accessible for men
November 19, 2018 - Short Interpregnancy Intervals Tied to Adverse Outcome Risk
November 19, 2018 - New mothers’ breastfeeding pain can affect infant health
November 19, 2018 - Stanford Medicine magazine reports on ways digital technology is transforming health care | News Center
November 19, 2018 - Human drugs alter cricket personality
November 19, 2018 - Insilico Medicine to introduce ‘Cure a disease in a year’ program at Biodata World Congress 2018
November 19, 2018 - Experts debate over whether gut or brain is more important in regulating appetite
November 19, 2018 - Playing on fear and fun, hospitals follow pharma in direct-to-consumer advertising
November 19, 2018 - 2PG Company receives grant to develop sensitive, low-cost molecular diagnostic tests for tuberculosis
November 19, 2018 - Low-Carb Diets May Work By Boosting Calorie Burn
November 19, 2018 - Key molecule responsible for learning and memory discovered
November 19, 2018 - New blood test developed for early diagnosis of ovarian cancer
November 19, 2018 - Researchers identify molecule to fight myotubular myopathy
New Zealand’s secret recipe for active school travel: The neighborhood built environment

New Zealand’s secret recipe for active school travel: The neighborhood built environment

image_pdfDownload PDFimage_print
Increased rates of active travel (e.g., walking or cycling) to school in New Zealand children and youth were associated with shorter distances to school, and neighborhoods with more connected streets, less residential density, and lower socio-economic status, reveals a new systematic meta-analysis published in Journal of Transport and Health. Credit: Illustrated by Carol Green. Copyright 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier.

Increased rates of active travel (e.g., walking or cycling) to school in New Zealand children and youth were associated with shorter distances to school, and neighborhoods with more connected streets, less residential density, and lower socio-economic status, reveals a new systematic meta-analysis published in Journal of Transport and Health.

Urban form changes over recent decades in New Zealand reflect car-oriented, low density neighborhoods and greater sprawl. Obesity is a public health problem estimated to cost the country NZ$849 million a year. New Zealand has one of the highest rates of child obesity, and the lowest rates of active travel to school internationally. With evidence clearly showing tracking of obesity and activity behaviors from childhood to later life, tackling these issues early is imperative. Understanding the reasons for the low, and declining prevalence of active travel to school has become a priority for governments, urban planners, public health practitioners, and school and community groups.

This review provides in-depth understanding of how self-reported active travel modes were associated with objectively measured neighborhood built environment features (e.g., density of residence and intersections, distance to school) using geographic information systems (GIS). The meta-analysis included five studies across four major cities in New Zealand involving 2,844 children and youth aged 6-19 years.

“Meta-analysis is regarded as problematic to perform in the area of the built environment due to measurement inconsistency between individual studies. However, our review was accomplished by collaborating with several researchers across the country,” said Erika Ikeda, MHSc and doctoral student, at Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand. “Our experience has demonstrated the importance and value of undertaking a process such as this despite the challenges, particularly for generating robust, context-specific information.

“Our findings can substantially contribute to the development of policy and programs as well as the improvement of walking and cycling infrastructure. For example, planning decisions for school locations and school zoning/catchment policies should consider the impact of distance to school. Creating walking and cycle paths, trails and greenways improves street connectivity in school neighborhoods,” Ms. Ikeda concluded.

This project is part of a larger investigation to identify “the secret recipe for active school travel,” funded by the Ministry for Business Innovation and Employment. Research leader Associate Professor Melody Smith stated: “This world-first project is a fundamental first step in generating a context-specific understanding of the complexities of supporting active travel modes to school. Sensitivity and specificity are so important when we consider relationships between the built environment and health. That’s what makes us so excited about this—when we combine these findings with insights from natural experiments and stakeholder interviews, we will have a truly comprehensive and context-specific model for school travel that can be used to inform urban planning practice, and ultimately improve physical activity and child health.”


Explore further:
Stop prioritizing the car to tackle childhood obesity, governments / planners urged

More information:
Erika Ikeda et al, Built environment associates of active school travel in New Zealand children and youth: A systematic meta-analysis using individual participant data, Journal of Transport & Health (2018). DOI: 10.1016/j.jth.2018.04.007

Tagged with:

About author

Related Articles