Breaking News
February 20, 2019 - Health Tip: Get Your Child to School on Time
February 20, 2019 - Shortcut strategy for screening compounds with clinical potentials for drug development
February 20, 2019 - Common acid reflux drugs tied to elevated risk for kidney disease
February 20, 2019 - Microbiome could be culprit when good drugs do harm
February 20, 2019 - Prenatal exposure to forest fires causes stunted growth in children
February 20, 2019 - Gene therapy restores hearing in mice with congenital genetic deafness
February 20, 2019 - First molecular test predicts treatment response for kidney cancer
February 20, 2019 - New method for improved visualization of single-cell RNA- sequencing data
February 20, 2019 - Researchers capture altered brain activity patterns of Parkinson’s in mice
February 20, 2019 - A possible blood test for detecting Alzheimer’s disease before symptoms show
February 20, 2019 - Primary care physicians associated with longevity, new research finds
February 19, 2019 - New study identifies many key lessons to establish sanctioned safe consumption sites
February 19, 2019 - Single CRISPR treatment can safely and stably correct genetic disease
February 19, 2019 - Multinational initiative to study familial primary distal renal tubular acidosis
February 19, 2019 - Breakthrough study highlights the promise of cell therapies for muscular dystrophy
February 19, 2019 - Subsymptom Threshold Exercise Speeds Concussion Recovery
February 19, 2019 - Midline venous catheters – infants: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia
February 19, 2019 - Searching for side effects
February 19, 2019 - Humanity is all right, probably, although human extinction remains quite possible, researcher says
February 19, 2019 - Having Anesthesia Once as a Baby Does Not Cause Learning Disabilities, New Research Shows
February 19, 2019 - Anti-cancer immunotherapy could be used to fight HIV
February 19, 2019 - Customized Micropatterning for Improved Physiological Relevance
February 19, 2019 - Unique gene therapy approach paves new way to tackle rare, inherited diseases
February 19, 2019 - Activating gene that helps excite neurons reverses depression in male mice
February 19, 2019 - Science Puzzling Out Differences in Gut Bacteria Around the World
February 19, 2019 - Cells that destroy the intestine
February 19, 2019 - On recovery, vulnerability and ritual: An exhibit in white
February 19, 2019 - Scientific Duo Gets Back To Basics To Make Childbirth Safer
February 19, 2019 - COPD patients need more support when understanding new chest symptoms
February 19, 2019 - Using light-based method for production of pharmaceutical molecules
February 19, 2019 - Scientists find link between inflammation and cancer
February 19, 2019 - The High Cost Of Sex: Insurers Often Don’t Pay For Drugs To Treat Problems
February 19, 2019 - Hearing impairment associated with accelerated cognitive decline with age
February 19, 2019 - Researchers identify multiple genetic variants associated with body fat distribution
February 19, 2019 - Influenza and common cold are completely different diseases, study shows
February 19, 2019 - Scientists untangle how microbes manufacture key antibiotic compound
February 19, 2019 - Greater primary care physician supply associated with longer life spans
February 19, 2019 - HIV-1 protein suppresses immune response more broadly than thought
February 19, 2019 - Brain imaging indicates potential success of drug therapy in depressive patients
February 19, 2019 - For 2020 Dem Hopefuls, ‘Medicare-For-All’ Is A Defining Issue, However They Define It
February 19, 2019 - Specialized lung cells appear in the developing fetus much earlier than previously thought
February 19, 2019 - KU professor discusses promise of brain-computer interface to aid, restore communication
February 19, 2019 - Highly effective solution for detecting onset of aggregation in nanoparticles
February 19, 2019 - Early marker of cardiac damage triggered by cancer treatment identified
February 19, 2019 - Antidepressant drug could save people from deadly sepsis, research suggests
February 19, 2019 - CRISPR technology creates pluripotent stem cells that are ‘invisible’ to the immune system
February 19, 2019 - New study establishes how stress favors breast cancer growth and spread
February 19, 2019 - Midlife Systemic Inflammation Linked to Later Cognitive Decline
February 19, 2019 - Therapy derived from parasitic worms downregulates proinflammatory pathways
February 19, 2019 - Antimicrobial reusable coffee cups are less likely to become contaminated with bacteria, study shows
February 19, 2019 - Harnessing the evolutionary games played by cancer cells to advance therapies
February 19, 2019 - AHA News: Heart Transplant Survivor Gets Wedding Proposal at Finish Line
February 19, 2019 - HIV hidden in patients’ cells can now be accurately measured
February 19, 2019 - Research finds reasons for sudden cardiac death in patients with stable ischemic disease
February 19, 2019 - New protocol could help physicians to rule out bacterial infections in infants
February 19, 2019 - Women experiencing miscarriage should be offered treatment choices
February 19, 2019 - New protocol can help identify febrile infants at low risk for serious bacterial infections
February 19, 2019 - Innovative way to block HIV runs into a roadblock
February 19, 2019 - Springer Nature with BCRF conduct pilot project to make their research datasets more accessible
February 19, 2019 - Study finds neuromelanin-sensitive MRI as potential biomarker for psychosis
February 19, 2019 - Improvements in cardiovascular care for elderly save billions in health care costs
February 19, 2019 - Chilean food regulations are changing food perceptions and purchasing habits, study suggests
February 19, 2019 - Index endoscopy results are crucial for assessment of Barrett’s patients
February 18, 2019 - Breast cancer screening age should be lowered to 35
February 18, 2019 - Brain synchronization depends on the language of communication
February 18, 2019 - Drug Company Payments Over Time May Influence Rx Practices
February 18, 2019 - Despite socioeconomic gains, black-white ‘health gap’ remains
February 18, 2019 - Researchers report progress in the treatment of aggressive brain tumors
February 18, 2019 - Scientists discover trigger that turns strep infections into devastating disease
February 18, 2019 - Scanning children’s teeth may predict future mental health issues
February 18, 2019 - Health Highlights: Feb. 14, 2019
February 18, 2019 - New knowledge could help predict and prevent depression
February 18, 2019 - More primary care physicians leads to longer life spans | News Center
February 18, 2019 - Study examines link between supply of primary care physicians and life expectancy
February 18, 2019 - New study assesses screen time in young children
February 18, 2019 - Patented IU discovery to treat ARDS has been optioned to Theratome Bio
February 18, 2019 - Software found to be four times better at monitoring ovarian cancer
February 18, 2019 - Male Y chromosomes not ‘genetic wastelands’
February 18, 2019 - Hormone therapy during gender transition may increase risk for cardiovascular events
February 18, 2019 - NICE renews accreditation for Advanced
American College of Rheumatology receives grants to support development of lupus clinical trials

American College of Rheumatology receives grants to support development of lupus clinical trials

image_pdfDownload PDFimage_print

The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) today announced the receipt of two, two-year grants from the Office of Minority Health (OMH) to support the development of programs that aim to increase the recruitment and enrollment in lupus clinical trials of minority populations affected by lupus.

“This is the sixth year ACR has been awarded a grant from the OMH. We are very excited to work with our members and partners to expand programs that focus on improving minority participation in clinical trials,” says Sheryl McCalla, JD, Senior Director of Collaborative Initiatives (COIN) at the ACR. “Clinical trial results often do not reflect the entire lupus patient population. The lack of diversity in clinical trials reduces opportunities for discovering potential differences in the effects a treatment may have in disparate groups of patients, but there are challenges in getting people to enroll in lupus clinical trials. Therefore, over the next two years, COIN will work with ACR member-experts on the Materials to Increase Minority Involvement in Clinical Trials (MIMICT) and the Community Health Worker Lupus Clinical Trials Training (LuCTT) projects to address some of these challenges.”

ACR will utilize $500,000 in funds from a two-year OMH grant to develop, evaluate, and disseminate modifications of the ACR’s current model for the MIMICT program model developed in 2017 with OMH grant funding to increase minority participation in lupus clinical trials. The initial MIMICT program helped clinical trials sites and providers to work together to deliver accurate, trusted, and understandable information to people with lupus so that they can make informed decisions about participation in clinical trials. Over the next two years, ACR will expand and modify MIMICT by broadening the pool of providers and patients to which it applies.

The ACR has partnered with two of its member- experts to apply their distinct experiences and resources for the benefit of MIMICT. Dr. Saira Z. Sheikh, MD, Assistant Professor, Rheumatology, Allergy & Immunology, University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill, who is Director of the Lupus and Clinical Trials Programs at the UNC Thurston Arthritis Research Center and Allen Anandarajah, MD, MS, Associate Professor, Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology, University of Rochester Medical Center. Dr. Sheikh will harness UNC’s collective expertise in developing clinical trials education programs for minorities to the benefit of MIMICT.

“The modified MIMICT program will include projects that focus on primary care providers serving Latino patients, and health teams specializing in nephrology and dermatology (including physician assistants, nurse practitioners, nurses and others) as referral sources,” says Dr. Sheikh. “Our goal through this important national initiative is to ensure that all lupus patients, across the country are informed and educated about participation in clinical trials, which may provide opportunities to access new and cutting edge therapies, and to enable rheumatologists to build effective partnerships with colleagues in primary care and sub-specialties to achieve this goal.”

Dr. Anandarajah will utilize the strategies and lessons learned from his Improve Quality in Low-income, Underserved, Poor, Underprivileged, SLE patients (IQ-LUPUS) project to inform MIMICT in connection with building community partnerships, and evaluating minority clinical trial education and participation programs.

“Building genuine connections and trustworthy partnerships with the community are critical to accurately identifying the educational needs of the under-educated portion of the minority populations.” Dr. Anandarajah explains.

At the same time, the ACR will utilize $375,000 in funds from a second two-year OMH grant to develop a separate program related to clinical trials that will focus on minority recruitment. Using a different approach from MIMICT, the LuCTT program will aim to promote the recruitment and enrollment of minority populations affected by lupus into clinical trials by making use of community health workers (CHW) as referral sources. The LuCTT program model will include multiple interconnected components that will be used by state, local, and community organizations to host regional CHW training summits on lupus clinical trial recruitment support.

The ACR has partnered with Albert Einstein College of Medicine in Bronx, NY and local CHW networks for implementation of specific aspects of the LuCTT program. Irene Blanco, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine – Rheumatology and Associate Dean of Diversity Enhancement at Albert Einstein College of Medicine will provide the vital support necessary to ensure cohesiveness in preparation and planning of content development, implementation, evaluation, dissemination and publication.

“We will be able to leverage the amazing work already accomplished by CHWs to now have an increased focus on lupus and lupus clinical trials,” says Dr. Blanco.

Source:

https://www.rheumatology.org/About-Us/Newsroom/Press-Releases/ID/936/American-College-of-Rheumatology-Receives-Grants-to-Help-Increase-Access-to-Clinical-Trials-for-Minority-Populations-Affected-by-Lupus

Tagged with:

About author

Related Articles