Breaking News
January 19, 2019 - 4.6 percent of Massachusetts residents have opioid use disorder
January 19, 2019 - New study suggests vital exhaustion as risk factor for dementia
January 19, 2019 - New antibiotic discovery heralds breakthrough in the fight against drug-resistant bacteria
January 19, 2019 - Ural Federal University scientists synthesize a group of multi-purpose fluorophores
January 19, 2019 - Researchers identify new therapeutic target in the fight against chronic liver diseases
January 19, 2019 - Preparation, characterization of Soyasapogenol B loaded onto functionalized MWCNTs
January 19, 2019 - FDA Approves Ontruzant (trastuzumab-dttb), a Biosimilar to Herceptin
January 19, 2019 - Tobacco use linked with higher use of opioids and sedatives
January 19, 2019 - Study delves deeper into developmental dyslexia
January 19, 2019 - Anti-vaccination movement one of the top health threats in 2019 says WHO
January 19, 2019 - Newly developed risk score more effective at identifying type 1 diabetes
January 19, 2019 - Highly effective protocol to prepare cannabis samples for THC/CBD analysis
January 19, 2019 - Prinston Pharmaceutical Inc. Issues Voluntary Nationwide Recall of Irbesartan and Irbesartan HCTZ Tablets Due to Detection of a Trace Amount of Unexpected Impurity, N-Nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) in the Products
January 19, 2019 - How does solid stress from brain tumors cause neuronal loss, neurologic dysfunction?
January 19, 2019 - $14.7 million partnership to supercharge vaccine development
January 19, 2019 - Ian Fotheringham receives Charles Tennant Memorial Lecture award
January 19, 2019 - Brain vital signs detect neurophysiological impairments in players with concussions
January 19, 2019 - Lack of job and poor housing conditions increased likelihood of people attending A&E
January 19, 2019 - Novel targeted drug delivery system improves conventional cancer treatments
January 19, 2019 - Rutgers study finds gene responsible for spread of prostate cancer
January 19, 2019 - Complications Higher Than Expected for Invasive Lung Tests
January 19, 2019 - 3-D printed implant promotes nerve cell growth to treat spinal cord injury
January 19, 2019 - Automated texts lead to improved outcomes after total knee or hip replacement surgery
January 19, 2019 - Poor cardiorespiratory fitness could increase risk of future heart attack, finds new study
January 19, 2019 - Drinking soft drinks while exercising in hot weather may increase risk of kidney disease
January 19, 2019 - Formlabs 3D prints anatomical models
January 19, 2019 - Heart-Healthy Living Also Wards Off Type 2 Diabetes
January 19, 2019 - Teaching Kids to Be Smart About Social Media (for Parents)
January 19, 2019 - Metabolite produced by gut microbiota from pomegranates reduces inflammatory bowel disease
January 19, 2019 - Researchers examine how spray from showers and toilets expose us to disease causing bacteria
January 19, 2019 - Behavioral experiments confirm that additional neurons improve brain function
January 19, 2019 - New study compares performance of real-time infectious disease forecasting models
January 19, 2019 - Obesity can be risk factor for developing renal cell carcinoma, confirms study
January 19, 2019 - New regulation designs on cigarette packs direct smokers’ attention to health warnings
January 19, 2019 - QIAGEN receives first companion diagnostic approval in Japan
January 19, 2019 - Study explores role of Dunning-Kruger effect in anti-vaccine attitudes
January 19, 2019 - Newly identified subset of immune cells may be key to fighting chronic inflammation
January 19, 2019 - New immune response regulators discovered
January 18, 2019 - Poor blood oxygenation during sleep predicts chance of heart-related death
January 18, 2019 - First international consensus on the diagnosis and management of fibromuscular dysplasia
January 18, 2019 - Rapid resistance gene sequencing technology can hasten identification of antibiotic-resistant bacteria
January 18, 2019 - Researchers develop artificial enzymatic pathway for synthesizing isoprenoids in E. coli
January 18, 2019 - Scientists advise caution in immunotherapy research
January 18, 2019 - How children across the world develop language
January 18, 2019 - Columbia Medical Student Receives McDonogh Scholarship
January 18, 2019 - Secretive ‘Rebate Trap’ Keeps Generic Drugs For Diabetes And Other Ills Out Of Reach
January 18, 2019 - Plant based diet could be the best option for the planet says commission
January 18, 2019 - New conservation practice could reduce nitrogen from agricultural drainage, study shows
January 18, 2019 - UIC researchers receive $1.7 million NCI grant to study Southeast Asian fruit
January 18, 2019 - New study determines the fate of DNA derived from genetically modified food
January 18, 2019 - Scientists develop new gene therapy that prevents axon destruction in mice
January 18, 2019 - Study finds critically low HPV vaccination rates among younger adolescents in the U.S.
January 18, 2019 - Brain cells involved in memory play key role in reducing future eating behavior
January 18, 2019 - Risk for Conversion of MS Varies With Different Therapies
January 18, 2019 - Investigational cream may help patients with inflammatory skin disease
January 18, 2019 - Medical school news office receives six writing awards | News Center
January 18, 2019 - County By County, Researchers Link Opioid Deaths To Drugmakers’ Marketing
January 18, 2019 - Research reveals risk for developing more than one mental health disorder
January 18, 2019 - Scientists discover a dramatic pattern of bone growth in female mice
January 18, 2019 - Study finds link between lengthy periods of undisturbed maternal sleep and stillbirths
January 18, 2019 - New nuclear medicine method could improve detection of primary and metastatic melanoma
January 18, 2019 - Combination therapy shows high efficacy in treating people with leishmaniasis and HIV
January 18, 2019 - Health Tip: Don’t Ignore Changes in Skin Color
January 18, 2019 - Dietary Recommendations for Healthy Children
January 18, 2019 - Eliminating the latent reservoir of HIV
January 18, 2019 - Pain From The Government Shutdown Spreads. This Time It’s Food Stamps
January 18, 2019 - Newly discovered regulatory mechanism helps control fat metabolism
January 18, 2019 - New rapid blood tests could speed up TB diagnosis, save the NHS money
January 18, 2019 - Researchers develop intelligent system for ‘tuning’ powered prosthetic knees
January 18, 2019 - Monoclonal antibody pembrolizumab prolongs survival in patients with squamous cell carcinoma
January 18, 2019 - Microrobots could one day deliver drugs inside the body
January 18, 2019 - Maintaining an active lifestyle in older age could prevent dementia
January 18, 2019 - New research detects mosquito known to transmit malaria for the first time in Ethiopia
January 18, 2019 - Researchers identify new genes linked to development of age-related macular degeneration
January 18, 2019 - Computerized method helps better protect pharma patents
January 18, 2019 - New guidelines to make swallowing safer for people in Australian nursing homes
January 18, 2019 - Lumex Instruments’ RA-915AM monitor installed at Hg treatment plant in Almadén, Spain
January 18, 2019 - ACCC survey finds multiple threats to growth of cancer programs
January 18, 2019 - Meeting the challenge of engaging men in HIV prevention and treatment
January 18, 2019 - Furloughed Feds’ Health Coverage Intact, But Shutdown Still Complicates Things
Regular skiing and running at low altitudes can delay aging

Regular skiing and running at low altitudes can delay aging

image_pdfDownload PDFimage_print

A doctor could tell you that skiing and running will most likely slow down aging. But how come mathematicians and physicists give their scientific support to this point of view?

Most biologists and medical professionals would agree that skiing and running can delay aging. This is essentially because of the direct positive impact on the body due to good exercise and physical fitness. However there is a much more subtle effect in this direction from a mathematician’s and physicist’s point of view.

As most of you already know, time and relativity have a unique connection between them. There was a time in history when hardly anyone from the general public understood Einstein’s special theory of relativity formulated in 1905. Initially only some mathematicians and physicists could decipher his equations and understand the concept of time dilation in a moving body. Time dilation means that a clock moving relative to an observer will be measured to tick slower than a clock that is at rest in the observer’s own frame of reference.

Within few years, more scientists and more people from the general audience started to understand and appreciate the significance of his result. Time dilation, twin paradox experiment, clock cartoons and so on became talk of the day!

In 1915, Einstein came up with the general theory of relativity which puzzled academics and laymen even more. Only a handful of mathematicians and physicists at the time could digest his concept of explaining gravity by unifying space and time into a mathematical fabric using tensor calculus. In later years, people started to notice and measure the effect of gravitational fields on the passage of time. In today’s world, these are well established and time tested theories which even gain occasional mentions in popular sci-fi comics and sci-fi movies.

The dangers of climbing the stairs

Last year an article in Norwegian Titan.uio.no focused on this general relativity part. This is to do with the acceleration of passage of time (i.e. time running faster) due to change in gravitational field when you go up a mountain or climb stairs! Technically this is due to the change in curvature of space-time when you move farther away from the center of Earth. It is commendable that Norway is one of very few countries where they try to include aspects of general theory of relativity in the curricula for training school and college students.

The simple summary of the above result is: if someone spends decades of their life consistently on some very high mountain peaks (like Himalayas), one would age faster by some hundreds of microseconds; exact count depending on the specific height and respective times spent (about 100 microseconds per decade at 3000 meters above). An accuracy of order microseconds over a decade-long span is something that is achievable using modern-day Cesium atomic clocks. Hence this is a realistically measurable range in today’s times if you plant one clock each on the summit and the base of the mountain.

The perks of being a skier

However, there is an interesting counter effect from the special relativistic side, if you are a Norwegian. A blind assumption that all Norwegians ski a lot plus run a lot is not too far from reality!

For a top-end skiing professional, assuming typical speeds of about 100 km/hr and duration of one race of about 2 minutes, one gains about half a picosecond. Assuming an active skiing career spanning a decade (about 1000 races), the person would age lesser by about half a nanosecond.

For a recreational skier/runner, decades of running and ski-training would result in gaining a few nanoseconds over an average Norwegian’s lifespan (assuming an average recreational skiing/running speed of 12 km/hr, gaining a nanosecond would require about 5000 hours of training, which is easily achievable in an average lifetime of a nordic person).

A nanosecond-precision time measurement over decades might sound like an impossible feat at the level of conventional engineering we are familiar with. However, the level of sophistication that exists today at the cutting edge of engineering and instrumentation is quite remarkable.

The latest example is the LIGO experiment which won the Nobel prize for physics this year. The experimental set up is a technological marvel capable of detecting ripples in space-time that cause changes of the order of one-ten thousandth the size of an atomic nucleus. Moreover the observation which fetched the Nobel was a collision event that happened 1.3 billion years ago between two black holes with masses each of about 30 times that of our sun. This measurement in itself shows the standards of accuracy and precision levels in modern scientific instrumentation. This applies to the latest atomic clocks too.

Measuring time has become easier

More pertinent to this discussion is the advent of optical lattice clocks, that have an accuracy of about one second in 13.8 billion years (i.e. age of universe), or equivalently, about a nanosecond per decade.

Clearly, measuring a nanosecond-scale time shift resulting from many years or decades of high-speed skiing or long-distance running is not hopelessly beyond the reach of present-day technology.

Astronaut twins are no longer the same age

Moreover this core concept was tested using twin astronaut brothers last year. One of the twins, Scott Kelly, a NASA astronaut, spent 340 days aboard the International Space Station while his twin brother Mark Kelly was enjoying his life on ground (i.e. planet Earth).

The International Space Station is about 400 km up from the Earth’s surface and hence the astronaut will age faster by about 1.1 milliseconds during this period due to space-time curvature effect (as discussed in the case of mountains).

However the astronaut was racing at about 28,000 km/hr around the Earth during this period (a faster version of skiing). This leads to a counter effect which estimates that the astronaut on the shuttle aged slower by about 9.6 milliseconds due to this high velocity.

The net effect is that the astronaut aged slower (or gained a bit of time!) by about 8.5 milliseconds during this period which is a good reason to celebrate!

It turns out that, in low-earth orbits, the special relativistic slowdown dominates over the gravitational speedup – the two effects become roughly equal when the spacecraft’s orbital radius is 1.5 times the Earth’s radius. Any astronaut orbiting at a larger radius would in fact age faster than their colleagues on Earth. A similar calculation has been done for frequent air travellers.

Realistically, of course, there are much more serious effects to consider, like increased radiation exposure, zero gravity challenges, bio-rhythm changes and dietary problems on board space shuttles and hence it is not just clocks which matter for health & overall well being of a human!!!

But with regular skiing and running (at low altitudes only!), you certainly are slowing down aging (both fitness-wise and relativistically speaking!) without all these ill effects from space! As they say, every little counts!

Source:

https://titan.uio.no/node/2584

Tagged with:

About author

Related Articles